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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:19 pm 
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Drivers can fight more than previously. Hamilton won the race on the prime tyres which should of been they say 1 second difference. So you can defend more and fight for position on both sets of tyres.

What do you think.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:30 pm 
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yes they did struck a nicer balance.

Also, teams have plenty on their plate, so tyres are not their primary concern anymore.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:05 pm 
It took a few embarrassing years, but the FIA and Pirelli are finally tuning the tires to deliver the racing they desired.

The goal was to have tires that could not be ignored, influenced strategy, and brought about scenarios where drivers on different tires changed position on track because of when and where they changed tires. The tires were supposed to influence the racing, but not dominate it (as in a few previous years).


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:21 pm 
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Tires seem to be better so far this year. We'll see what happens at Silverstone, and hopefully there won't be a repeat of last year. There was a lot of clag on the straight in China, but that may have been exaggerated by the TV camera's viewpoint.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:59 pm 
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I think they can still go harder with the tyres.
Driver's tyres are still suffering badly when they have to follow another car.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 9:01 pm 
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babararacucudada wrote:
I think they can still go harder with the tyres.
Driver's tyres are still suffering badly when they have to follow another car.

Wouldn't that be contributed to thermal deg. Which is how they are having the cars blister. And ruin tyres that way so there isn't any marbles on track


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 9:10 pm 
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Pirelli's first season in 2011 was actually pretty good from memory without any huge issues - I suspect they were conservative. Then they went the 'push the boundary' route the following years, giving teams tyres that were unpredictable and inconsistent. Data collated at tracks meant nothing as they had to start from scratch at each venue such was the unpredictability of the tyres.

Their objective was achieved - they gave us a show, a terrible one at that, which was half their fault. But all it did was create a lot of anger amongst the drivers and the crowd, and the hostility shown was certainly very damaging to the Pirelli brand. But they've come back this year as in 2011, by providing teams with tyres that can do the task without too much unpredictably. So my answer is yes, Pirelli has struck the right balance this year.

On another positive note, I once said that Pirelli should be commended for allowing its Pirelli logo to be embossed on the tyres in different colours. This is very significant in the conservative corporate world that is normally extremely paranoid of the public getting confused by corporate colour changes and then going off and buying products from the competitors. Can you imagine Toyota ever having their name written in blue? No, because people will accidently buy Nissans as a result! That won't happen, but that's how fickle these idiots are. I'll go one step further: Bridgestone has done the same for MotoGP bikes, by using differing colours to identify the compounds in use. However, the colour change is restricted to the stripe only; the actual Bridgestone name remains white! Their fear is that if Bridgestone did their name in yellow, that people will switch to Pirelli or switch to Michelin with blue.

So hats off for Pirelli for at least putting their image on the line for the sport, not just by taking the hard option of producing tyres that quickly degrade at their long-term expense, but also for the 'slap in the corporate world's face' by using different colours to display their brand. It was highlighted in Malaysia during qualifying where cars kept switching between intermediates and full-wets; how confusing would it have been if we had no markings as in the past? It's a part of the show that I enjoy, and even my fiance was making comments on the choices made when the tyres were changed.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 9:07 am 
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ClubF1 wrote:
Pirelli's first season in 2011 was actually pretty good from memory without any huge issues - I suspect they were conservative. Then they went the 'push the boundary' route the following years, giving teams tyres that were unpredictable and inconsistent. Data collated at tracks meant nothing as they had to start from scratch at each venue such was the unpredictability of the tyres.

Their objective was achieved - they gave us a show, a terrible one at that, which was half their fault. But all it did was create a lot of anger amongst the drivers and the crowd, and the hostility shown was certainly very damaging to the Pirelli brand. But they've come back this year as in 2011, by providing teams with tyres that can do the task without too much unpredictably. So my answer is yes, Pirelli has struck the right balance this year.

On another positive note, I once said that Pirelli should be commended for allowing its Pirelli logo to be embossed on the tyres in different colours. This is very significant in the conservative corporate world that is normally extremely paranoid of the public getting confused by corporate colour changes and then going off and buying products from the competitors. Can you imagine Toyota ever having their name written in blue? No, because people will accidently buy Nissans as a result! That won't happen, but that's how fickle these idiots are. I'll go one step further: Bridgestone has done the same for MotoGP bikes, by using differing colours to identify the compounds in use. However, the colour change is restricted to the stripe only; the actual Bridgestone name remains white! Their fear is that if Bridgestone did their name in yellow, that people will switch to Pirelli or switch to Michelin with blue.

So hats off for Pirelli for at least putting their image on the line for the sport, not just by taking the hard option of producing tyres that quickly degrade at their long-term expense, but also for the 'slap in the corporate world's face' by using different colours to display their brand. It was highlighted in Malaysia during qualifying where cars kept switching between intermediates and full-wets; how confusing would it have been if we had no markings as in the past? It's a part of the show that I enjoy, and even my fiance was making comments on the choices made when the tyres were changed.


Intresting points. I kinda agree about 2011; the early season was a shock to the system after coming from bulletproof bridgestones but I don't think the tyres were too bad all things considered, although they definitely did harden up during the season. I don't buy that the 2012 and 2013 tyres were bad though, by mid-season the teams had a good handle on how the tyres behaved (leaving the 2013 blowouts aside which was a construction issue rather than a compound issue) and they became less of a talking point. The teams just did a bad job of understanding the tyres early season, with some teams (Sauber and Lotus in particular) scoring good results by quickly getting on top of things.

This year the tyres are more predictable which sadly does take away some of the unpredictability (I think I'm in a minority when I say I enjoyed that) but it does mean everyone seems much happier. I think what we have now is good.

I never gave any thought to the colours on the sidewalls but I guess you're right, it's unusual for a company's logo to appear in different colours. Pirelli does have strong trackside branding to go along with it though, I wonder if that's why they're not so bothered? It seems quite easy for the average fan to get the red and yellow into their heads via the trackside advertising and block out linking the colour of the tyre sidewall to the Pirelli logo. No idea, just a guess :)

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 9:22 am 
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The tyres are great this year. Perfect balance IMO

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 4:14 pm 
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Yes.

That won't stop Bernie and the FIA getting tyres changed later in the season to improve "the show" and stretch out the WDC until the last race.

If not that, then I wouldn't be surprised if RBR start having major safety issues with the present rubber that forces a re-formulation. Expect Daniel to have a big event sometime around Spa, or maybe even Singapore.

I'm not a cynic, honest.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 5:18 pm 
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Yes, they've done well. For the last couple of years, the tires were too much in the headlines. They shouldn't take center stage like that. This season, you still see multiple stops every race but you are not seeing the tires as the major limiting factor in performance. THat's pretty close to ideal in my opinion.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 10:17 am 
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There were plenty of marbles at China for the first time this year. But overall it was not bad as China was very wide track. There is still significant degradation in performance over laps which is good to be honest. We saw how Caterham easily puked away from redbull on fresh tyres. This means in first half of the race,v people can use the fresh tyres strategically and play the undercut game like Ferrari did to gain significant advantage. Then they can manage the tyres better towards the end with lower fuel load.
So yes, atleast for now it looks like there is nice balance. Spain should give us clearer picture.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 12:10 pm 
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Jeepkhana wrote:
Tires seem to be better so far this year. We'll see what happens at Silverstone, and hopefully there won't be a repeat of last year. There was a lot of clag on the straight in China, but that may have been exaggerated by the TV camera's viewpoint.

I'm not into 'technicalities' by any stretch of the imagination, and so was suprised at the amount of rubber marbles in China - bearing in mind the tyres seemed to be lasting pretty well.

In view of this I agree that the tyres this season seem to have struck the right balance.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 3:15 pm 
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I think they've been spot on for every race this year so far, with the exception of China. They were too soft in China, therefore they had trouble with marbles and cars not being able to race as closely as seen before in 2014. Of course, this may have been as a result of the low temperatures and green track however.

Amazingly, only a few short years ago we were all asking for softer tyres. Now, we want hard tyres again.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 3:48 pm 
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Wasn't it Pirelli's decision to go with a slightly harder compound this year? All the FIA did last year was criticize Pirelli and gave the tire manufacturer no guidance for 2014.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 5:04 pm 
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It has helped that Pirelli has been allowed to test with current cars. In the past they had to extrapolate from out of date cars (ie. guess). The extra testing this year should help further.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 4:11 am 
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This is the first year that Pirelli have got it anywhere near "right". The rice paper tyres are gone and drivers can actually push a little bit.,, part of the reason why Vettel is struggling is because others can now race properly and not just conserve their tyres.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 6:29 pm 
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jrwb6e wrote:
Wasn't it Pirelli's decision to go with a slightly harder compound this year? All the FIA did last year was criticize Pirelli and gave the tire manufacturer no guidance for 2014.

The hardness of the rubber isn't what has made the tires better. It's the molecular composition of the rubber and the construction that has resulted in better tires this year. 'Bout damn time!!!

No matter how excellent tires are, there will always be marbling of some sort and it varies from track to track and corner to corner. On tracks with long sweeping, high speed corners the marbles will usually be finer and a bit further off the racing line because the speed of the cars means the rubber being scrubbed off is finer and once it rolls off the edge of the tire it will come to rest farther away from the racing line than on low speed corners.


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