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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 9:31 am 
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Reading this I am not surprised that he sounded a bit unwell on the team radio in Barcelona, I wonder if it is actually worth it:

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.ph ... ave-weight


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:01 am 
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Probably explains why he sounded exhausted in the car

For some reason I recall only Schumacher and Trulli never needing a drinks bottle. Could be wrong. It certainly isn't easy

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:19 am 
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In places like Malaysia, I'm guessing it's a must. However, drivers these days are so physically fit and constantly hydrated out of the car, driving around for 90mins shouldn't be a problem at most circuits, so I can see Hamilton's reasoning.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:20 am 
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There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:11 am 
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Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


Was a 6kg saving for the Merc ever confirmed?
They took on like 1kg for the T wing support, so it would still be overweight without the drinks bottle as it stands.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:25 am 
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He also said the race was flat out from lap 1, wow when was the last time we heard that - we had a genuine all out race last sunday. He said he didn't have the energy to jump into his team at the end and that nearly finished him off. I think a drinks bottle is only 900-1000ml so only a 1kg too. But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.

I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:31 am 
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lamo wrote:
But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.
I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year


My thoughts exactly.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:54 am 
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lamo wrote:
He also said the race was flat out from lap 1, wow when was the last time we heard that - we had a genuine all out race last sunday. He said he didn't have the energy to jump into his team at the end and that nearly finished him off. I think a drinks bottle is only 900-1000ml so only a 1kg too. But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.

I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year

Yeah I think it's quite obvious that Hamilton was driving flat out throughout the race that's why he was so knackered, he was out of breath even in the early stages of the race.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 1:14 pm 
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Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.

That's what I thought too.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 2:12 pm 
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mds wrote:
Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


Was a 6kg saving for the Merc ever confirmed?
They took on like 1kg for the T wing support, so it would still be overweight without the drinks bottle as it stands.

Not sure. The discussion was before the race and the anticipated difference it may make. Someone (lamo I think? Could be wrong, sorry) suggested that 6KG would make a fairly negligible difference with these cars, but if Lewis is so concerned about 2KG that he would risk dehydrating then the implication is that 6KG would make a fairly heft difference indeed


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 2:32 pm 
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Zoue wrote:
mds wrote:
Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


Was a 6kg saving for the Merc ever confirmed?
They took on like 1kg for the T wing support, so it would still be overweight without the drinks bottle as it stands.

Not sure. The discussion was before the race and the anticipated difference it may make. Someone (lamo I think? Could be wrong, sorry) suggested that 6KG would make a fairly negligible difference with these cars, but if Lewis is so concerned about 2KG that he would risk dehydrating then the implication is that 6KG would make a fairly heft difference indeed


I've read from people much smarter than me that the issue isn't the weight itself (or at least not the greatest extent of the issue), its more that it leaves them less room for maneuver when it comes to finding a nice balance to the car. If you're underweight, you can position the ballast to assist with car setup. If you're overweight, you have no opportunity to pick and choose where your weight is located.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 2:37 pm 
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Zoue wrote:
mds wrote:
Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


Was a 6kg saving for the Merc ever confirmed?
They took on like 1kg for the T wing support, so it would still be overweight without the drinks bottle as it stands.

Not sure. The discussion was before the race and the anticipated difference it may make. Someone (lamo I think? Could be wrong, sorry) suggested that 6KG would make a fairly negligible difference with these cars, but if Lewis is so concerned about 2KG that he would risk dehydrating then the implication is that 6KG would make a fairly heft difference indeed


No that wasn't me, I was asking if anyone had data on how weight affects these hybrid cars. I could be wrong, but the more torque the engine has the less the influence of weight? I believe weight is less important than the V8 era but I am sure more technical people know better. I remember bringing up that Senna battled Prost being 7-8 kg heavier over 88 and 89 (because they just weighed the car) and being told that Prost did have a big advantage but it wasn't as much as 0.2-0.3 as it would have been in the V8 era because the turbo engines had no much more power.

I did speculate the opposite though, if Mercedes shed 6kg over night without losing performance through it I would expect up to a couple of tenths.

Either way, saving weight on a drinks bottle is completely "free time" so you can't compare it to other things. Its ok to have a 1kg drink if your car is 20kg underweight and you run 19kg ballast and 1 kg drink. If your car is already 6kg over weight then having a drink or any unnecessary weight is much different.

Saving a kilo elsewhere could be a million per kilo or more for all we know.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 4:12 pm 
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With weight savings that small I imagine the major gain is in the positioning of the ballast rather then the actual weight penalty on performance.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 4:24 pm 
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The thing is if the cars are so close in speed that they are nearly identical then you have to try every single trick to find performance.

But to be frank, I would carry a can of Monster and a packet of twiglets and then eat them in front of at the camera after winning the race in parc ferme. That would be class. The champagne sponsor would not be happy however!


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:10 pm 
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MistaVega23 wrote:
In places like Malaysia, I'm guessing it's a must. However, drivers these days are so physically fit and constantly hydrated out of the car, driving around for 90mins shouldn't be a problem at most circuits, so I can see Hamilton's reasoning.

While it's good to start a physical activity well hydrated, how fast you need to start drinking during that activity will depend on what conditions you're in.

Even on a cooler day these drivers are wearing 2 layers over their whole body, a fire hood and helmet on their heads, and are surrounded by hot radiators an engine and sitting on a battery that heats up with use. They will be hot enough to require hydration over the course of 90 minutes especially with the cars being more physical to drive this year.

Loss of physical and cognitive performance due to dehydration is a real thing I don't think will be outweighed by any mechanical benefit gained by having 2 kilos less weight on board the car.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:29 pm 
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I don't think the wt is going to make any measurable difference. In Karting some of the highest level guys and mechanics say that 5-10 pounds is worth about .2-.3 of a sec. This is a 360 pound weight limit class with a small 2 stroke engine and no torque and a single speed (125cc TAG). So 2kg (4.4 lbs) on a 1550 lb car? We are talking thousandths of a second, maybe


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:32 pm 
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rodH wrote:
I don't think the wt is going to make any measurable difference. In Karting some of the highest level guys and mechanics say that 5-10 pounds is worth about .2-.3 of a sec. This is a 360 pound weight limit class with a small 2 stroke engine and no torque and a single speed (125cc TAG). So 2kg (4.4 lbs) on a 1550 lb car? We are talking thousandths of a second, maybe

Then what would be the point do you think?


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:57 pm 
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Dont know why, but I thought the drink bottle was a compulsory fitting.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 6:35 pm 
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pokerman wrote:
lamo wrote:
He also said the race was flat out from lap 1, wow when was the last time we heard that - we had a genuine all out race last sunday. He said he didn't have the energy to jump into his team at the end and that nearly finished him off. I think a drinks bottle is only 900-1000ml so only a 1kg too. But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.

I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year

Yeah I think it's quite obvious that Hamilton was driving flat out throughout the race that's why he was so knackered, he was out of breath even in the early stages of the race.

That's not necessarily the sole reason for someone being out of breath. Sometimes adrenaline can cause you do feel exhaustion the way Hamilton did on Sunday.
While these guys are completely used to driving these cars at insane speeds, Hamilton got exactly what he asked for and found himself at a disadvantage to Vettel early on and that could have jump started his trip down adrenaline lane and having to fight to remain within striking distance, and continuing to feel the pressure of performing as well as possible in front of the entire world likely kept adrenaline levels rather high, thus contributing to him not being able to catch his breath properly.

It was frantic all race long and his out lap on the Softs was a blistering one which put him right on Vettel's tailpipe and then the stress of his tires possibly going off and causing him to lose time to Vettel was also a source of stress and therefore adrenaline.

All in all it was one of the best races and duels we've seen in some time.

The drink bottle not being in the car probably had a non-existent effect on performance and only helped Hamilton in his head. If he wants to keep weight as low as possible, maybe he should go back to his buzz haircut which looked so much better than the mop he's rocking ATM.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 9:07 pm 
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I'm surprised we haven't heard Hamilton or Bottas talk about dropping weight. They are two of the stockier drivers.


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 9:37 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm surprised we haven't heard Hamilton or Bottas talk about dropping weight. They are two of the stockier drivers.


Hamilton could shed a few pounds of gold easy enough :twisted:


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:04 pm 
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rodH wrote:
I don't think the wt is going to make any measurable difference. In Karting some of the highest level guys and mechanics say that 5-10 pounds is worth about .2-.3 of a sec. This is a 360 pound weight limit class with a small 2 stroke engine and no torque and a single speed (125cc TAG). So 2kg (4.4 lbs) on a 1550 lb car? We are talking thousandths of a second, maybe

It's supposedly 10kg = 0.3 seconds, or at least that's the number that's been bandied around F1 circles for the longest time. Who knows how accurate it is anymore.

For 1kg, that would imply 0.030, so hundredths instead of thousandths. Over the course of a 66 lap race, 0.030 per lap = 1.98 seconds. Races have been won or lost on less than that, so maybe it isn't as crazy as it sounds.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:06 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm surprised we haven't heard Hamilton or Bottas talk about dropping weight. They are two of the stockier drivers.

Lewis Stocky? No way. he is lean. He's gained some muscle the past 4 years but certainly he has athletic build at best.
Bottas' head makes him appear stocky but he is actually pretty lean himself and when you see his overalls pulled down you can see he's not at all big.
But he's got a serious noggin on him. LOL

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 10:30 pm 
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Exediron wrote:
rodH wrote:
I don't think the wt is going to make any measurable difference. In Karting some of the highest level guys and mechanics say that 5-10 pounds is worth about .2-.3 of a sec. This is a 360 pound weight limit class with a small 2 stroke engine and no torque and a single speed (125cc TAG). So 2kg (4.4 lbs) on a 1550 lb car? We are talking thousandths of a second, maybe

It's supposedly 10kg = 0.3 seconds, or at least that's the number that's been bandied around F1 circles for the longest time. Who knows how accurate it is anymore.

For 1kg, that would imply 0.030, so hundredths instead of thousandths. Over the course of a 66 lap race, 0.030 per lap = 1.98 seconds. Races have been won or lost on less than that, so maybe it isn't as crazy as it sounds.


Where did you read that? Is that with regards to the hybrid engines?

I know 1 lap of fuel at Barcelona used to cost 0.08 and be 2kg back in the V8 era so that would make 10kg 0.400 - same kind of ball park.

Exideron > you are wrong, just read this article from a few seasons ago - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/motors ... oblem.html

Button is quoted as 5kg = 0.2 per lap in the article too.

"“The problem is that it will stop people looking at taller drivers in the future. You could have a very talented driver who could be missed for his height and weight even if he is the fittest and skinniest driver ever to be in a racing car. If he is over the weight by five kilos that is 0.2 secs-a-lap and it is the end of your career basically."

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:15 pm 
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Ennis wrote:
Zoue wrote:
mds wrote:
Zoue wrote:
There was a discussion in another thread recently how 6KG weight savings for the gearbox wouldn't make that much of a difference with these cars. I guess this answers that if a 2KG sacrifice is deemed so important.


Was a 6kg saving for the Merc ever confirmed?
They took on like 1kg for the T wing support, so it would still be overweight without the drinks bottle as it stands.

Not sure. The discussion was before the race and the anticipated difference it may make. Someone (lamo I think? Could be wrong, sorry) suggested that 6KG would make a fairly negligible difference with these cars, but if Lewis is so concerned about 2KG that he would risk dehydrating then the implication is that 6KG would make a fairly heft difference indeed


I've read from people much smarter than me that the issue isn't the weight itself (or at least not the greatest extent of the issue), its more that it leaves them less room for maneuver when it comes to finding a nice balance to the car. If you're underweight, you can position the ballast to assist with car setup. If you're overweight, you have no opportunity to pick and choose where your weight is located.

Yes indeed being lighter has advantages provided the driver still has the strength to drive the cars.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:19 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm surprised we haven't heard Hamilton or Bottas talk about dropping weight. They are two of the stockier drivers.

I think the drivers were told to beef up a bit over the winter so they would have the strength to drive these cars over a race distance?

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 11:22 pm 
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lamo wrote:
Exideron > you are wrong, just read this article from a few seasons ago - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/motors ... oblem.html

Button is quoted as 5kg = 0.2 per lap in the article too.

"“The problem is that it will stop people looking at taller drivers in the future. You could have a very talented driver who could be missed for his height and weight even if he is the fittest and skinniest driver ever to be in a racing car. If he is over the weight by five kilos that is 0.2 secs-a-lap and it is the end of your career basically."

Ouch! :lol:

Maybe I am wrong, but I do have multiple articles agreeing with my 10kg = 0.3 seconds figure.

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/127972
https://ca.motor1.com/news/135085/formu ... tter-2017/
https://uk-sport-f1.yahoo.com/post/1567 ... ight-again
"Despite the weight handicap - with 10kg of extra weight costing 0.3 seconds per lap, this increase accounts to a loss of nearly one second in total - the extra downforce and mechanical grip is expected to produce cars that are five seconds per lap quicker than in 2015."

Mind you, all of these articles seem to contain the same text, so it's probably all just copied from the autosport one.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 6:29 am 
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Exediron wrote:
lamo wrote:
Exideron > you are wrong, just read this article from a few seasons ago - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/motors ... oblem.html

Button is quoted as 5kg = 0.2 per lap in the article too.

"“The problem is that it will stop people looking at taller drivers in the future. You could have a very talented driver who could be missed for his height and weight even if he is the fittest and skinniest driver ever to be in a racing car. If he is over the weight by five kilos that is 0.2 secs-a-lap and it is the end of your career basically."

Ouch! :lol:

Maybe I am wrong, but I do have multiple articles agreeing with my 10kg = 0.3 seconds figure.

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/127972
https://ca.motor1.com/news/135085/formu ... tter-2017/
https://uk-sport-f1.yahoo.com/post/1567 ... ight-again
"Despite the weight handicap - with 10kg of extra weight costing 0.3 seconds per lap, this increase accounts to a loss of nearly one second in total - the extra downforce and mechanical grip is expected to produce cars that are five seconds per lap quicker than in 2015."

Mind you, all of these articles seem to contain the same text, so it's probably all just copied from the autosport one.


Always the same though: 0.3 on what kind of track? Length, characteristics? You can't just state a number and then say "this is the correct number, that one is not". Maybe it is 0.3 for 10kg on average, and Button could still have been right if he had a certain track in mind. Maybe it is not correct for the current formula, maybe it is less than before or even more, maybe ...

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 6:51 am 
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lamo wrote:
Exediron wrote:
rodH wrote:
I don't think the wt is going to make any measurable difference. In Karting some of the highest level guys and mechanics say that 5-10 pounds is worth about .2-.3 of a sec. This is a 360 pound weight limit class with a small 2 stroke engine and no torque and a single speed (125cc TAG). So 2kg (4.4 lbs) on a 1550 lb car? We are talking thousandths of a second, maybe

It's supposedly 10kg = 0.3 seconds, or at least that's the number that's been bandied around F1 circles for the longest time. Who knows how accurate it is anymore.

For 1kg, that would imply 0.030, so hundredths instead of thousandths. Over the course of a 66 lap race, 0.030 per lap = 1.98 seconds. Races have been won or lost on less than that, so maybe it isn't as crazy as it sounds.


Where did you read that? Is that with regards to the hybrid engines?

I know 1 lap of fuel at Barcelona used to cost 0.08 and be 2kg back in the V8 era so that would make 10kg 0.400 - same kind of ball park.

Exideron > you are wrong, just read this article from a few seasons ago - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/motors ... oblem.html

Button is quoted as 5kg = 0.2 per lap in the article too.

"“The problem is that it will stop people looking at taller drivers in the future. You could have a very talented driver who could be missed for his height and weight even if he is the fittest and skinniest driver ever to be in a racing car. If he is over the weight by five kilos that is 0.2 secs-a-lap and it is the end of your career basically."

I respect Button, but surely this is wholly dependent on track characteristics, not to mention length? To take but two extremes, it's doubtful it would cost 0.2s at both Monaco and Spa?

edit: ninja'd by mds!


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 7:20 am 
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mds wrote:
Always the same though: 0.3 on what kind of track? Length, characteristics? You can't just state a number and then say "this is the correct number, that one is not". Maybe it is 0.3 for 10kg on average, and Button could still have been right if he had a certain track in mind. Maybe it is not correct for the current formula, maybe it is less than before or even more, maybe ...

True. I assume the track in question is probably Barcelona, since that's the quintessential testing track in F1, but you're quite right that it won't be the same at every track. It's more useful as a rule of thumb than anything else.

Either way, if we take the range as 0.2-0.4 for 10kg, then the loss of Lewis' drink bottle will still be worth a second or two over a race distance. Potentially enough to win a race by, but I can't really get behind putting yourself in a position where you might faint and cause a massive accident, even for a few seconds. The FIA really should step in to make sure nobody does that in the future, IMO.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 7:35 am 
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moby wrote:
Dont know why, but I thought the drink bottle was a compulsory fitting.


Perhaps it should be, we saw a lot of ridiculousness a few years ago with drivers starving themselves, do we really want for the drivers to be dehydrating themselves unnecessarily as well? Where do you draw the line, will all the drivers be chugging laxatives all weekend?

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 8:28 am 
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What he is doing is well within the rules, and up to him.
But for me, the drinks bottle should be mandatory. Not only that, it should be kept cool. Somehow.


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 9:11 am 
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F1 MERCENARY wrote:
Bottas' head makes him appear stocky but he is actually pretty lean himself and when you see his overalls pulled down you can see he's not at all big.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 11:48 am 
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F1 MERCENARY wrote:
pokerman wrote:
lamo wrote:
He also said the race was flat out from lap 1, wow when was the last time we heard that - we had a genuine all out race last sunday. He said he didn't have the energy to jump into his team at the end and that nearly finished him off. I think a drinks bottle is only 900-1000ml so only a 1kg too. But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.

I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year

Yeah I think it's quite obvious that Hamilton was driving flat out throughout the race that's why he was so knackered, he was out of breath even in the early stages of the race.

That's not necessarily the sole reason for someone being out of breath. Sometimes adrenaline can cause you do feel exhaustion the way Hamilton did on Sunday.
While these guys are completely used to driving these cars at insane speeds, Hamilton got exactly what he asked for and found himself at a disadvantage to Vettel early on and that could have jump started his trip down adrenaline lane and having to fight to remain within striking distance, and continuing to feel the pressure of performing as well as possible in front of the entire world likely kept adrenaline levels rather high, thus contributing to him not being able to catch his breath properly.

It was frantic all race long and his out lap on the Softs was a blistering one which put him right on Vettel's tailpipe and then the stress of his tires possibly going off and causing him to lose time to Vettel was also a source of stress and therefore adrenaline.

All in all it was one of the best races and duels we've seen in some time.

The drink bottle not being in the car probably had a non-existent effect on performance and only helped Hamilton in his head. If he wants to keep weight as low as possible, maybe he should go back to his buzz haircut which looked so much better than the mop he's rocking ATM.


I have another theory about the breathlessness.

What if Hamilton's seat belts were too tight and restricted his breathing. I couldn't help but notice that he immediately undid them to celebrate once the race was over. How often does he do that?


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 1:17 pm 
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inky38 wrote:
F1 MERCENARY wrote:
pokerman wrote:
lamo wrote:
He also said the race was flat out from lap 1, wow when was the last time we heard that - we had a genuine all out race last sunday. He said he didn't have the energy to jump into his team at the end and that nearly finished him off. I think a drinks bottle is only 900-1000ml so only a 1kg too. But he is probably over hydrated before the race to compensate so its probably more like half that saved.

I see a lot of necks going in Brazil this year

Yeah I think it's quite obvious that Hamilton was driving flat out throughout the race that's why he was so knackered, he was out of breath even in the early stages of the race.

That's not necessarily the sole reason for someone being out of breath. Sometimes adrenaline can cause you do feel exhaustion the way Hamilton did on Sunday.
While these guys are completely used to driving these cars at insane speeds, Hamilton got exactly what he asked for and found himself at a disadvantage to Vettel early on and that could have jump started his trip down adrenaline lane and having to fight to remain within striking distance, and continuing to feel the pressure of performing as well as possible in front of the entire world likely kept adrenaline levels rather high, thus contributing to him not being able to catch his breath properly.

It was frantic all race long and his out lap on the Softs was a blistering one which put him right on Vettel's tailpipe and then the stress of his tires possibly going off and causing him to lose time to Vettel was also a source of stress and therefore adrenaline.

All in all it was one of the best races and duels we've seen in some time.

The drink bottle not being in the car probably had a non-existent effect on performance and only helped Hamilton in his head. If he wants to keep weight as low as possible, maybe he should go back to his buzz haircut which looked so much better than the mop he's rocking ATM.


I have another theory about the breathlessness.

What if Hamilton's seat belts were too tight and restricted his breathing. I couldn't help but notice that he immediately undid them to celebrate once the race was over. How often does he do that?


I noticed that too, and I'm not sure being thirsty would make him out of breath anyway...

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 1:35 pm 
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ALESI wrote:
I noticed that too, and I'm not sure being thirsty would make him out of breath anyway...

When you're dehydrated your blood volume is lower which causes your heart rate to go up. When your heart rate is up your breathing rate also has to go up in order to keep getting enough oxygen into the bloodstream.

So yes, dehydration can lead to breathlessness when you're exerting yourself.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 1:36 pm 
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RaggedMan wrote:
ALESI wrote:
I noticed that too, and I'm not sure being thirsty would make him out of breath anyway...

When you're dehydrated your blood volume is lower which causes your heart rate to go up. When your heart rate is up your breathing rate also has to go up in order to keep getting enough oxygen into the bloodstream.

So yes, dehydration can lead to breathlessness when you're exerting yourself.

He was out of breath from very early on in the race so I would doubt that.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 1:51 pm 
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pokerman wrote:
RaggedMan wrote:
ALESI wrote:
I noticed that too, and I'm not sure being thirsty would make him out of breath anyway...

When you're dehydrated your blood volume is lower which causes your heart rate to go up. When your heart rate is up your breathing rate also has to go up in order to keep getting enough oxygen into the bloodstream.

So yes, dehydration can lead to breathlessness when you're exerting yourself.

He was out of breath from very early on in the race so I would doubt that.

I wasn't speaking about this race in particular. Just pointing out that being dehydrated affects more than just whether or not you feel thirsty.

As I also pointed out further up the thread I don't think that the effect it has on cognitive function favors the driver in the risk/reward calculation.
Quote:
In the tests involving the young men, mild dehydration caused some difficulty with mental tasks, particularly in the areas of vigilance and working memory, according to the results of the second UConn study.
-snip-
Mild dehydration is defined as an approximately 1.5 percent loss in normal water volume in the body.
-snip-
“Our thirst sensation doesn’t really appear until we are 1 [percent] or 2 percent dehydrated. By then dehydration is already setting in and starting to impact how our mind and body perform,” says Lawrence E. Armstrong, one of the studies’ lead scientists and an international expert on hydration.

https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/02/20/dehydration-influences-mood-cognition/35037.html

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 1:59 pm 
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It is also worth remembering that Hamilton hasn't had to push in a race for more than 5-6 lap stints between 2014-2016, then of course these cars are much more physical and now you can push the tyres almost every lap. He said himself he pushed the entire race from lap 1 all the way. Its definitely the hardest race he has put done in many many years and all these things have occurred at once to make the races harder.

Malaysia, Brazil and some other tracks are going to be huge physical test this year like they used to be.

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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 3:00 pm 
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Its important to remember he pushed hard all the way and didn't really make any significant errors - and won. Could being out of breath and pushing hard cause him to make errors? Yes, but he has proven he can handle it now too.


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