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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:55 pm 
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Ferrari's recent disaster really has me thinking about how is it possible that a spark plug can fail. There are no moving parts and the object is designed to last a very significant length of time. Surely Ferrari tests these things before they go into an engine. I just can't figure out how a spark plug can fail. Are F1 spark plugs different from the ones used in road cars in any significant way? Perhaps that can explain it.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:14 pm 
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Herb Tarlik wrote:
Ferrari's recent disaster really has me thinking about how is it possible that a spark plug can fail. There are no moving parts and the object is designed to last a very significant length of time. Surely Ferrari tests these things before they go into an engine. I just can't figure out how a spark plug can fail. Are F1 spark plugs different from the ones used in road cars in any significant way? Perhaps that can explain it.


Allowing current to get to ground without crossing the electrodes. Cracked insulator usually

Edit, usually from the spanner fitting them. :twisted: Which would be after they were tested and found OK.

Could this be due to Ferrari mechanics getting the scare about not working fast enough?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:32 pm 
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Could also be Ferrari's Quality Control department :uhoh:

I would of thought that an element such as a spark plug would of been installed at the Engine Manufacturing facility, torqued appropriately and tested to ensure it worked?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:42 pm 
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There is a lot of talk on the Autosport forum who seem to think that Ferrari have done something with the most recent engine update that puts pressure on the combustion and that this might have had something to do with it. The fact that Lewis also had a faulty spark plug but that it was caught and changed in parc ferme makes me think that perhaps this issue isn't as uncommon as we are led to believe.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:57 pm 
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Flash2k11 wrote:
There is a lot of talk on the Autosport forum who seem to think that Ferrari have done something with the most recent engine update that puts pressure on the combustion and that this might have had something to do with it. The fact that Lewis also had a faulty spark plug but that it was caught and changed in parc ferme makes me think that perhaps this issue isn't as uncommon as we are led to believe.



Quite possible as the ignition is usually instigated by the plug and has not had time to build up. If they are using cloud combustion there could be a 'shock front' hitting the plug and may induce a vibration at the frequency that damages the insulation or electrode. I wonder if this was what Honda suffered with early in the year?

@Malkiiin. The plug was no doubt tested before fitting, but the tap tith a spanner may have been when fitting another component close to it. It sometimes takes very little, even leaning on it while reaching past can do it. (other times you can't smash em with a bloody sledge hammer :lol: )


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:00 pm 
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With that spark plug failure, did they confirm that Vettel actually lost a cylinder during the race?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:14 pm 
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Given the extreme conditions inside a F1 engine, the narrow tolerance for operating windows, it means that even a simple spark plug can be affected far more easily.

This was a complete failure, meaning that it probably wasn't a result of a mis timing (and an F1 engine will have a much higher precision for timing than even the most expensive road car)

Ferrari's engines have seen significant leaps forwards over the last 12 months in terms of performance, and they are moving to bleeding edge manufacturing techniques (3D printing as much as they can for instance) and it's probably that as they push the envelope forwards as quickly as they can they will start to strain even the simplest components. The spark plug could have got damaged as a result of something else in the engine behaving out of spec first, for instance.

Or maybe Ferrari have developed a new type of spark plug that is extra efficient at timing and allows more a more explosive detonation of the fuel.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:15 pm 
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I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:18 pm 
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ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?


They are not running diesel pressures. We have clear evidence that the engines are using spark plugs.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:19 pm 
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Alienturnedhuman wrote:
Given the extreme conditions inside a F1 engine, the narrow tolerance for operating windows, it means that even a simple spark plug can be affected far more easily.

This was a complete failure, meaning that it probably wasn't a result of a mis timing (and an F1 engine will have a much higher precision for timing than even the most expensive road car)

Ferrari's engines have seen significant leaps forwards over the last 12 months in terms of performance, and they are moving to bleeding edge manufacturing techniques (3D printing as much as they can for instance) and it's probably that as they push the envelope forwards as quickly as they can they will start to strain even the simplest components. The spark plug could have got damaged as a result of something else in the engine behaving out of spec first, for instance.

Or maybe Ferrari have developed a new type of spark plug that is extra efficient at timing and allows more a more explosive detonation of the fuel.


With TJI the actual space in the head to put the plug through will be reduced, so they may be, as you say, on the limits of what they can get away with. Most of the materials that come to mind if I was making a very small plug are banned by FIA, so it is a probability


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:28 pm 
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Spark plug failure can be more then just the plug itself. If the spark plug electrode or insulator go bad you can have no ignition in that specific cylinder causing a "dead" cylinder effect since that plug isnt producing spark/ignition to complete the combustion cycle. Also lets not forget that these engines run very high fuel mixtures along with oil burning which foul/clog the plugs also causing similar issues related to the plug itself being faulty. Further more will also cause multiple sensors on the vehicle to believe there is an engine problem and possibly switch the air/fuel mixture to a default setting to save the engine itself.

So to answer your question yes, a bad plug can fail in multiple ways & cost you a power deficit as the engine will not be running at its full potential.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:40 pm 
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Herb Tarlik wrote:
ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?


They are not running diesel pressures. We have clear evidence that the engines are using spark plugs.

If they ran diesel pressures then things would get very explodey. Diesels operate the way they do because it is far less combustable than petrol so it needs the high pressure to burn with enough power.

A turbo allows them to cram a lot more air into the cylinder head than the stroke draws in - however it doesn't mean that when it's compressed it necessarily higher - because they may make the combustion chamber bigger as a result.

In very simple terms (and using numbers nice for maths rather than anything realistic):

For example, if the combustion chamber is 1.6L and the engine 1.6L, then it will be compressed to twice the pressure. But if the combustion chamber is 0.8L and the engine 1.6L, then it gets compressed to three times the pressure.

However, a turbo could push in an extra 1.6L of air than the engine naturally draws, so for an engine with 1.6L of space in the combustion chamber, it's then squeezing 4.8L of air into 1.6L, which is the same level of compression as the N/A 1.6 with a 0.8L combustion chamber.

The benefit of this? Well, with 4.8L of air you can burn twice as much fuel, and get twice the power.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:57 pm 
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ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?

This is what Ferrari apperently use, similar to HCCI but still requires a spark plug. AFAIAA the regulations only allow combustion by a spark plug.

The newly developed Mahle Jet Ignition lean burn combustion process relies on a special surface ignition, which in turn allows for higher engine performance. The ingenious trick here is that the air-fuel mixture is pre-ignited in a pre-chamber around the spark plug. This results in the formation of plasma jets that reach the piston primarily at the outer edge and ignite the remainder of the mixture. While ignition normally takes place in the centre of the cylinder, with Mahle Jet Ignition it essentially takes place from the outside toward the inside. This allows significantly better combustion of the fuel mixture. The result: more power with considerably less residue. Mahle Jet Ignition makes a decisive contribution to fulfilling the new regulations in Formula 1: maximum performance with a limited quantity of fuel. With this lean burn combustion process developed by Mahle Powertrain for Scuderia Ferrari, a substantially greater efficiency can be achieved than with previous ignition concepts, allowing for further improved performance in motorsport.
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opini ... t-ignition

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:41 pm 
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Covalent wrote:
ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?

This is what Ferrari apperently use, similar to HCCI but still requires a spark plug. AFAIAA the regulations only allow combustion by a spark plug.

The newly developed Mahle Jet Ignition lean burn combustion process relies on a special surface ignition, which in turn allows for higher engine performance. The ingenious trick here is that the air-fuel mixture is pre-ignited in a pre-chamber around the spark plug. This results in the formation of plasma jets that reach the piston primarily at the outer edge and ignite the remainder of the mixture. While ignition normally takes place in the centre of the cylinder, with Mahle Jet Ignition it essentially takes place from the outside toward the inside. This allows significantly better combustion of the fuel mixture. The result: more power with considerably less residue. Mahle Jet Ignition makes a decisive contribution to fulfilling the new regulations in Formula 1: maximum performance with a limited quantity of fuel. With this lean burn combustion process developed by Mahle Powertrain for Scuderia Ferrari, a substantially greater efficiency can be achieved than with previous ignition concepts, allowing for further improved performance in motorsport.
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opini ... t-ignition



What messes the engine builders up its the FIA limit of (I think) 17:1 on compression ratio. Good diesels run over 20:1 I think some even over 25:1. They can not go one way or the other but have to use a combination of both.


Ferrari now say 'Damage caused to spark plugs is mainly related to ICE and its combustion. It is not related with quality defects'


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:49 pm 
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moby wrote:



Ferrari now say 'Damage caused to spark plugs is mainly related to ICE and its combustion. It is not related with quality defects'


Sounds like Ferrari are going to have to turn down the wick on their power plant to prevent a re-occurrence. A quality problem would be much better for them as it's an easier correction.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:53 pm 
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moby wrote:
Covalent wrote:
ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?

This is what Ferrari apperently use, similar to HCCI but still requires a spark plug. AFAIAA the regulations only allow combustion by a spark plug.

The newly developed Mahle Jet Ignition lean burn combustion process relies on a special surface ignition, which in turn allows for higher engine performance. The ingenious trick here is that the air-fuel mixture is pre-ignited in a pre-chamber around the spark plug. This results in the formation of plasma jets that reach the piston primarily at the outer edge and ignite the remainder of the mixture. While ignition normally takes place in the centre of the cylinder, with Mahle Jet Ignition it essentially takes place from the outside toward the inside. This allows significantly better combustion of the fuel mixture. The result: more power with considerably less residue. Mahle Jet Ignition makes a decisive contribution to fulfilling the new regulations in Formula 1: maximum performance with a limited quantity of fuel. With this lean burn combustion process developed by Mahle Powertrain for Scuderia Ferrari, a substantially greater efficiency can be achieved than with previous ignition concepts, allowing for further improved performance in motorsport.
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opini ... t-ignition



What messes the engine builders up its the FIA limit of (I think) 17:1 on compression ratio. Good diesels run over 20:1 I think some even over 25:1. They can not go one way or the other but have to use a combination of both.


Ferrari now say 'Damage caused to spark plugs is mainly related to ICE and its combustion. It is not related with quality defects'

Interesting, didn't know they had a fixed compression ratio.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:56 pm 
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I wonder if this is related to Ferrari trying out a new quali mode of their own to better challenge the Q3- Mercedes?

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:27 pm 
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Covalent wrote:
I wonder if this is related to Ferrari trying out a new quali mode of their own to better challenge the Q3- Mercedes?


I'm more inclined to think that this was Ferrari's solution to the oil burning clarification, but perhaps they have pushed the boat out a bit too far and it has come back to bite them.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:30 pm 
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Covalent wrote:
ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?

This is what Ferrari apperently use, similar to HCCI but still requires a spark plug. AFAIAA the regulations only allow combustion by a spark plug.

The newly developed Mahle Jet Ignition lean burn combustion process relies on a special surface ignition, which in turn allows for higher engine performance. The ingenious trick here is that the air-fuel mixture is pre-ignited in a pre-chamber around the spark plug. This results in the formation of plasma jets that reach the piston primarily at the outer edge and ignite the remainder of the mixture. While ignition normally takes place in the centre of the cylinder, with Mahle Jet Ignition it essentially takes place from the outside toward the inside. This allows significantly better combustion of the fuel mixture. The result: more power with considerably less residue. Mahle Jet Ignition makes a decisive contribution to fulfilling the new regulations in Formula 1: maximum performance with a limited quantity of fuel. With this lean burn combustion process developed by Mahle Powertrain for Scuderia Ferrari, a substantially greater efficiency can be achieved than with previous ignition concepts, allowing for further improved performance in motorsport.
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opini ... t-ignition


Thanks. I knew I read something along the lines.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:58 pm 
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Mayhem wrote:
Spark plug failure can be more then just the plug itself. If the spark plug electrode or insulator go bad you can have no ignition in that specific cylinder causing a "dead" cylinder effect since that plug isnt producing spark/ignition to complete the combustion cycle. Also lets not forget that these engines run very high fuel mixtures along with oil burning which foul/clog the plugs also causing similar issues related to the plug itself being faulty. Further more will also cause multiple sensors on the vehicle to believe there is an engine problem and possibly switch the air/fuel mixture to a default setting to save the engine itself.

So to answer your question yes, a bad plug can fail in multiple ways & cost you a power deficit as the engine will not be running at its full potential.

Excellent info but as well, the construction of the spark plugs themselves is usually what causes them to fail. The ceramic portion is pressed and glued into the metal base and usually when a plug fails (outside of fouling) it is due to the ceramic separating from the base. Sometimes this separation also cause the internal resistor or copper core to break and on the rare occasion the center electrode can also break.

As to the engines running rich, they actually run very lean and with the introduced fuel consumption restrictions 4 seasons ago coupled with the ridiculous turbos, they run leaner than ever. What would add to, or make the burn cycle richer is the introduction of purposely burning oil as fuel which most likely results in the components of the plug coated with burned carbon which would more than likely limit their use to a single race, or very few at best. You want those surfaces as clean and shiny as possible so the spark is as strong as possible. In today's F1 Lean = Rich.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:20 pm 
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moby wrote:
Herb Tarlik wrote:
Ferrari's recent disaster really has me thinking about how is it possible that a spark plug can fail. There are no moving parts and the object is designed to last a very significant length of time. Surely Ferrari tests these things before they go into an engine. I just can't figure out how a spark plug can fail. Are F1 spark plugs different from the ones used in road cars in any significant way? Perhaps that can explain it.


Allowing current to get to ground without crossing the electrodes. Cracked insulator usually

Edit, usually from the spanner fitting them. :twisted: Which would be after they were tested and found OK.

Could this be due to Ferrari mechanics getting the scare about not working fast enough?

+1 for Cracked Insulator. Electricity has a mind of it's own sometimes...ok all the time.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:21 pm 
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Not that uncommon, I believe one of the Mercedes also changed a spark plug (in parc ferme) prior to the race in Japan. In fact its not unusual for cars to have a little work post qualifying before the race, its just not that often it gets reported.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:24 pm 
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lamo wrote:
Not that uncommon, I believe one of the Mercedes also changed a spark plug (in parc ferme) prior to the race in Japan. In fact its not unusual for cars to have a little work post qualifying before the race, its just not that often it gets reported.


How was Mercedes able to fix theirs so fast while Ferrari was left to die out on the track then?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:36 pm 
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Herb Tarlik wrote:
lamo wrote:
Not that uncommon, I believe one of the Mercedes also changed a spark plug (in parc ferme) prior to the race in Japan. In fact its not unusual for cars to have a little work post qualifying before the race, its just not that often it gets reported.


How was Mercedes able to fix theirs so fast while Ferrari was left to die out on the track then?


Again, going off how this discussion is going over on Autosport, but a few of them are saying Mercedes either caught it in the pits first thing or caught it on the lap round from the pits to the grid, wheras the Ferrari went bad having already been on the grid for a bit. Sounds plausible enough.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:37 pm 
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F1 MERCENARY wrote:
Mayhem wrote:
Spark plug failure can be more then just the plug itself. If the spark plug electrode or insulator go bad you can have no ignition in that specific cylinder causing a "dead" cylinder effect since that plug isnt producing spark/ignition to complete the combustion cycle. Also lets not forget that these engines run very high fuel mixtures along with oil burning which foul/clog the plugs also causing similar issues related to the plug itself being faulty. Further more will also cause multiple sensors on the vehicle to believe there is an engine problem and possibly switch the air/fuel mixture to a default setting to save the engine itself.

So to answer your question yes, a bad plug can fail in multiple ways & cost you a power deficit as the engine will not be running at its full potential.

Excellent info but as well, the construction of the spark plugs themselves is usually what causes them to fail. The ceramic portion is pressed and glued into the metal base and usually when a plug fails (outside of fouling) it is due to the ceramic separating from the base. Sometimes this separation also cause the internal resistor or copper core to break and on the rare occasion the center electrode can also break.

As to the engines running rich, they actually run very lean and with the introduced fuel consumption restrictions 4 seasons ago coupled with the ridiculous turbos, they run leaner than ever. What would add to, or make the burn cycle richer is the introduction of purposely burning oil as fuel which most likely results in the components of the plug coated with burned carbon which would more than likely limit their use to a single race, or very few at best. You want those surfaces as clean and shiny as possible so the spark is as strong as possible. In today's F1 Lean = Rich.


Excellent additional info :thumbup: :thumbup:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:44 pm 
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Covalent wrote:
moby wrote:
Covalent wrote:
ReservoirDog wrote:
I have a related question - we heard talks of new turbo something something technology that is now being used in these engines. What was said that they employ very high pressures (like diesel) to combust fuel rather than a spark plug. I am very sure I heard a lot of talk about that toward the end of last year. Even Honda was able to put that tech. in its 2017 engines.

I forgot the term (I think it was HCCII) or something so I can't google it, but I am 100% positive I heard about it.

So, how come these engines still use spark plugs?

This is what Ferrari apperently use, similar to HCCI but still requires a spark plug. AFAIAA the regulations only allow combustion by a spark plug.

The newly developed Mahle Jet Ignition lean burn combustion process relies on a special surface ignition, which in turn allows for higher engine performance. The ingenious trick here is that the air-fuel mixture is pre-ignited in a pre-chamber around the spark plug. This results in the formation of plasma jets that reach the piston primarily at the outer edge and ignite the remainder of the mixture. While ignition normally takes place in the centre of the cylinder, with Mahle Jet Ignition it essentially takes place from the outside toward the inside. This allows significantly better combustion of the fuel mixture. The result: more power with considerably less residue. Mahle Jet Ignition makes a decisive contribution to fulfilling the new regulations in Formula 1: maximum performance with a limited quantity of fuel. With this lean burn combustion process developed by Mahle Powertrain for Scuderia Ferrari, a substantially greater efficiency can be achieved than with previous ignition concepts, allowing for further improved performance in motorsport.
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opini ... t-ignition



What messes the engine builders up its the FIA limit of (I think) 17:1 on compression ratio. Good diesels run over 20:1 I think some even over 25:1. They can not go one way or the other but have to use a combination of both.


Ferrari now say 'Damage caused to spark plugs is mainly related to ICE and its combustion. It is not related with quality defects'

Interesting, didn't know they had a fixed compression ratio.


Its not fixed, its a maximum. I am not 100% sure about the numbers, and too lazy to look. I will look tomorrow if you really want?

Edit, I did and it is 17:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:53 pm 
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Flash2k11 wrote:
Herb Tarlik wrote:
lamo wrote:
Not that uncommon, I believe one of the Mercedes also changed a spark plug (in parc ferme) prior to the race in Japan. In fact its not unusual for cars to have a little work post qualifying before the race, its just not that often it gets reported.


How was Mercedes able to fix theirs so fast while Ferrari was left to die out on the track then?


Again, going off how this discussion is going over on Autosport, but a few of them are saying Mercedes either caught it in the pits first thing or caught it on the lap round from the pits to the grid, wheras the Ferrari went bad having already been on the grid for a bit. Sounds plausible enough.


I read this too, apparently the Ferrari rear end is a lot more tightly packaged too. A spark plug can be changed in under 15 minutes on the Mercedes. It is more 20-30 minutes on the Ferrari. Not sure how valid that info is, but what I read elsewhere.

Edit - just read that Hamilton was changed on satruday evening in parc ferme.

Image

Other drivers to change a spark plug in parc ferme this year -

China - Verstappen
Russia - Ericsson
Monaco - Ricciardo

Verstappen also retired in Spa with a spark plug failure

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:09 pm 
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Pretty surprising just how much work they let them do to the cars when they aren't meant to be touching them. I bet the list of parc ferme repairs over this season for all the teams would be a bit of an eye opener.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:47 pm 
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Flash2k11 wrote:
Pretty surprising just how much work they let them do to the cars when they aren't meant to be touching them. I bet the list of parc ferme repairs over this season for all the teams would be a bit of an eye opener.


The FIA publish them all every sunday. Loads gets changed!

If you've never looked, the timing and information page for each race on the FIA website is worth spending some time on!

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:47 pm 
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Flash2k11 wrote:
Pretty surprising just how much work they let them do to the cars when they aren't meant to be touching them. I bet the list of parc ferme repairs over this season for all the teams would be a bit of an eye opener.


I think the important thing with Parc Ferme is that parts can only be replaced like-for-like and not with updated or differently set up parts to ensure the car you run on Saturday is the same one you run on Sunday.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:12 pm 
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Flash2k11 wrote:
Pretty surprising just how much work they let them do to the cars when they aren't meant to be touching them. I bet the list of parc ferme repairs over this season for all the teams would be a bit of an eye opener.

But the thing is, the repairs/replacements of components teams have been allowed to do were not because teams were looking to improve performance in order to gain a competitive advantage. Such repairs/changes were necessary to have the cars working at 100% as they were when set to Parc Ferme status, and if a crucial component is found to be in questionable condition or not working altogether before the start of the race, and there's time to fix/address things as simple as Spark Plugs or ignition coil packs before the start of the race so the drivers make it to the grid and actually get to participate in the race, why not?

Once in Parc Ferme teams are not supposed to do work on the cars, but the FIA, under the advisement of Charlie & Co. have made exceptions many times so that teams could perform repairs on their cars, ranging from simple fixes to complete drivetrain replacements. I don't think a spark plug or a wing assembly is that big a deal that they would consider not allowing repairs, especially being that those types of repairs are so simple and take minutes, and if those components don't function properly the race is over for that driver. With the wings in particular it can be inherently dangerous to have one fail so I think that one is a common sense exception.

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