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What is your Favorite Era?
Pre-historic 1%  1%  [ 1 ]
50s 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
60s 9%  9%  [ 7 ]
70s 12%  12%  [ 10 ]
80s 23%  23%  [ 19 ]
90s 30%  30%  [ 24 ]
00s 16%  16%  [ 13 ]
10s 9%  9%  [ 7 ]
Total votes : 81
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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 5:57 pm 
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Just a fun little thread between races instead of all the pointless bickering. I was thinking about different eras in motorsport and which one I felt was the best. I really can't speak to the eras that pre-date me. I firmly believe that you have to be there (although I have massive respect for the 60s-Beautiful cars and legendary drivers).

For me, the late80s and early 90s were the pinnacle of the sport. It was the tail end of the time where there was still very real danger involved in the sport. You had Senna and Prost battling it out in F1 (easily my favorite era of F1) with great looking and sounding F1 cars. You also had the fabled Group C sports car prototypes winning Le Mans. Those are maybe my all time favorite prototypes; massive power and top speeds reaching 250 mph with a manual gearbox and oldschool brakes and demonic noises haunting the track. Those were the days where Le Mans was really special to me. Also I remember MotoGP having Kevin Schwantz and Wayne Rainy in those days, not to mention Steady Eddie Lawson. As an American, it was cool to have so many of the top riders come from the States. It's in stark contrast to today, where there are literally no American riders in grand prix racing.

How about you guys? What was your favorite motor sport era? I created a poll but it's difficult to space out the eras so you can pick two decades.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 6:15 pm 
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90's. Enough backmarkers to make it interesting and enough unreliability to make it random.

I miss the Pacifics, Minardis, Simteks, Larrousses, March's, Forti's, Lolas, Central Park Modenas, Fondmetals, Colonis, Andrea Modas, Osellas, Scuderia Italias and Lifes of the world.

F1 needs some unpredictability back. It needs some character.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 6:16 pm 
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I have a real soft spot for the era that Jackie Steward raced. Although I wasn’t around then I do love watching the old documentaries. To me it just epitomises the emotional side of F1 from the glitz and glamour, the talent, the derring-do to the camaraderie, the garage based privateers, and obviously danger and tragedy was never far away.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 7:41 pm 
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The 1960s. The cars were still being designed to go as fast as possible, they looked beautiful, and we saw all sorts of crazy technical innovations. It was also still in the era of sportsmanship, and the era of the driver I hold to be the best of all (Clark).

I also love driving 1960s cars in racing games. They have a sort of gentle slide under power that I find very fulfilling to manage.

EDIT: The only thing I don't like about the 60s is the lethality. I could do without that.

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 7:49 pm 
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Exediron wrote:
The 1960s. The cars were still being designed to go as fast as possible, they looked beautiful, and we saw all sorts of crazy technical innovations. It was also still in the era of sportsmanship, and the era of the driver I hold to be the best of all (Clark).

I also love driving 1960s cars in racing games. They have a sort of gentle slide under power that I find very fulfilling to manage.

EDIT: The only thing I don't like about the 60s is the lethality. I could do without that.


I was gonna make a thread asking for comparisons between Clark and Stewart about a week ago but I'll just ask here.

Stewart learned a lot from Clark and believed in his model and so presumably somewhat tried to emulate his driving style (from things I've read and heard here and there over the years)...

Did Jackie Stewart become nearly as strong as Jim Clark and what were their main differences on the track?


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 8:06 pm 
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Invade wrote:
Exediron wrote:
The 1960s. The cars were still being designed to go as fast as possible, they looked beautiful, and we saw all sorts of crazy technical innovations. It was also still in the era of sportsmanship, and the era of the driver I hold to be the best of all (Clark).

I also love driving 1960s cars in racing games. They have a sort of gentle slide under power that I find very fulfilling to manage.

EDIT: The only thing I don't like about the 60s is the lethality. I could do without that.


I was gonna make a thread asking for comparisons between Clark and Stewart about a week ago but I'll just ask here.

Stewart learned a lot from Clark and believed in his model and so presumably somewhat tried to emulate his driving style (from things I've read and heard here and there over the years)...

Did Jackie Stewart become nearly as strong as Jim Clark and what were their main differences on the track?

The homage can never be as great as the original. Stewart readily admits that he was no Jim Clark and in fact they did race against each other for a brief time. Clark was very quick over a single lap. Qualifying was clearly something that separated him from Stewart. I can't speak from direct experience though as this was before my time. I do know that Clark was fabled for being very smooth and delicate with his inputs and that is what Stewart most tried to emulate.

The 60s are a great era. The thing that kills me about the current era is that I feel like the drivers are so constrained. Back in the day, F1 really did seem like a test of which driver could go the closest to the edge. It was about who could go further and faster. Now it usually seems like a contest of showing restraint. Maybe that's somewhat rose-tinted glasses but that's a difference that I feel. We rarely see the limits of these current drivers in the current formula.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 8:13 pm 
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Well, Ferrari and Mercedes are so concerned with each other that they want to tiptoe around tracks on one-stop strategies all the time. I was watching the 2017 USA GP earlier and Ferrari pitted Vettel to cover off a Verstappen undercut, but both ended up ahead of Bottas and Raikkonen, the latter of which probably had better race pace than his team-mate. Hamilton managed to win with the more "conservative" strategy but his race-pace was excellent there.

Then there's the conservatism from Pirelli with the tyres, and the regulations in which things are built to last rather than go fast. Ferrari were able to run fast for 80% of races at times in 2017 before having to then hard conserve fuel, not that conserving fuel is a new thing... but yeah.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 8:25 pm 
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The 70’s for me. While I was round in the 60’s and I love the looks of the cars from most disciplines from that decade my best memories come from my teenage years.

Drivers drove in as many series as they could and the best of them won in everything they sat in. Aero made huge bounds in open wheels series (I know that’s not a popular opinion here), NASCAR were still production based cars, Le Mans was producing incredible cars, CAN-AM monsters with few limits, and Trans-Am running highly tweaked road cars as circuit cars.

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 9:25 pm 
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I went with the 60s for some of the reasons already mentioned..
The cars were beautiful and fast, both in F1 and Sports Cars. Some of the most iconic cars in both series came from that period. The Ferrari GTO, Ferrari P3/4, Ford Gt40 and so msny more in sports cars... and the Sharknose Ferrari, Gurney Eagle, Lotus' and others. In addition it was a great time in NASCAR (especially for a Petty fan, and then transition from the wonderful Indy front-engine roadsters to rear-engine "rockets". A great era indeed.

My other choice was the 2000s as I thoroughly enjoyed the Ferrari success in F1 and the Penske Indy successes. I also enjoyed NASCAR racing then as well.

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 10:49 pm 
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2005-2010

Six consecutive seasons with five different champions and not one dominant season. This was the most competitive period in modern F1.

The races could be boring sometimes, but before every weekend there was uncertainty about who would be competitive and who could pull an upset.

I wish I could have appreciated just how good we had it back then.


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 9:13 am 
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sandman1347 wrote:
Invade wrote:
Exediron wrote:
The 1960s. The cars were still being designed to go as fast as possible, they looked beautiful, and we saw all sorts of crazy technical innovations. It was also still in the era of sportsmanship, and the era of the driver I hold to be the best of all (Clark).

I also love driving 1960s cars in racing games. They have a sort of gentle slide under power that I find very fulfilling to manage.

EDIT: The only thing I don't like about the 60s is the lethality. I could do without that.


I was gonna make a thread asking for comparisons between Clark and Stewart about a week ago but I'll just ask here.

Stewart learned a lot from Clark and believed in his model and so presumably somewhat tried to emulate his driving style (from things I've read and heard here and there over the years)...

Did Jackie Stewart become nearly as strong as Jim Clark and what were their main differences on the track?

The homage can never be as great as the original. Stewart readily admits that he was no Jim Clark and in fact they did race against each other for a brief time. Clark was very quick over a single lap. Qualifying was clearly something that separated him from Stewart. I can't speak from direct experience though as this was before my time. I do know that Clark was fabled for being very smooth and delicate with his inputs and that is what Stewart most tried to emulate.

The 60s are a great era. The thing that kills me about the current era is that I feel like the drivers are so constrained. Back in the day, F1 really did seem like a test of which driver could go the closest to the edge. It was about who could go further and faster. Now it usually seems like a contest of showing restraint. Maybe that's somewhat rose-tinted glasses but that's a difference that I feel. We rarely see the limits of these current drivers in the current formula.

Stewart said they were Batman and Robin, with Clark being the Bat of course!


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 10:15 am 
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The sport was different throughout the eras. It's like picking which sport you like most. To me seventies, with eighties coming close. But, have to admit that I know nearly nothing of the prehistoric, 50's and 60's and thinking that it is the same with most forum members, I see that these years are somewhat handicapped.

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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 7:53 pm 
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the '80s, for similar reasons to the OP.

It's inevitable that as time progresses things get more professional and restricted, but back then it still seemed like anything was possible and everything was geared towards maximum performance. Of course drivers had to manage their races, but generally speaking they drove as fast as they could and pushed constantly, which I feel has been missing from F1 in recent years. Having said that, Pirelli's changed tyre philosophy is a big relief from the comedy rubber era, but I still feel tyres have too much influence.

But the '80s felt more raw and exciting. Of course there is an element of rose-tinted glasses as it's the era that first attracted me to F1, but I did feel it was more gladiatorial than now.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:19 am 
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KingVoid wrote:
2005-2010

Six consecutive seasons with five different champions and not one dominant season. This was the most competitive period in modern F1.

The races could be boring sometimes, but before every weekend there was uncertainty about who would be competitive and who could pull an upset.

I wish I could have appreciated just how good we had it back then.


Jep, exactly this except for me it's more 2004-2008 because after that the cars got so ugly, and the ''predictability'' started in 2009.
The 00's is when I was in my teens and I remember my dad watching and I remember the scream of the V10's. Like you, I wish I would have appreciated that now that they are gone.
I hated it back then but now I appreciate to have seen the Schumacher and Ferrari dominance. Also I was so happy when Renault and Alonso broke it, and in 2007 I remember thinking ''who the hell is this kid Hamilton who is giving Alonso such a run for his money in his first year?'' That was 11 years ago...

The best looking cars are from the 60's though.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:33 am 
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These types are questions usually yield the result of the best era is the era I started watching in.

Were the races even broadcast before the mid 1970’s? How could that be your favourite era if you couldn’t even watch the races?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:36 am 
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Every era has had its good points and bad points. As someone who started watching in the mid 90s, I still find so much to admire about the older eras: the immense bravery of the drivers, the genuine innovation and ingenuity that went into engineering the cars, and that the rulebook could pretty much be written on the back of a cigarette packet. But from a fan's perspective, was it actually watchable? Media coverage was minimal, race circuits were poorly designed (often around existing public roads) and gave little consideration to the concerns of the paying spectator, and the downside of the loose regulations and diversity of engineering concepts was that the sport wasn't particularly competitive and the cars were incredibly spread out. For instance I took a race at random (the 1964 British Grand Prix) and saw that only the top three finished on the same lap, of whom Surtees in third place finished a whopping 80 seconds behind the winner Clark. What good are cars that are good racing wheel-to-wheel if they are so far apart on track that they rarely even encounter each other? And then half the field didn't even finish because their cars broke down.

In my view F1 is as good now as it's ever been. It's certainly not perfect by any means and there are plenty of aspects of current F1 that I don't like: the political power of the top teams who wield it only to serve their own financial interests, the over-zealous focus on component conservation and enforced cost-saving, the use of artificial methods to promote overtaking without attempting to address the fundamental issue of over-reliance on aerodynamics, and the move to pay TV to name a few. But there is so much that is better than ever:
- The incredible media coverage that means we don't miss anything that happens on track. We get to hear from the drivers before, after and even during the race. We can discuss the finer details of the weekend's events with total strangers on an internet forum.
- The races are no longer a reliability lottery. I hate seeing races decided by issues outside the driver's control, and in my view breakdowns and mechanical problems played far too big a role in the past.
- We do have more overtaking and more wheel-to-wheel racing than at any time since the proliferation of complex aerodynamics in the 90s, even if I'm not massively enamored with how it has been achieved.
- The races are competitive, particularly in the midfield, and the field spread is relatively small compared to the past.
- I like a lot of the modern race tracks; they are safe, wide enough to promote overtaking and are designed with the spectators in mind. Most of the dull races we get nowadays are down to the cars rather than the circuits and there are only a couple (i.e. Sochi and Abu Dhabi) that I think are poorly designed.
- Finally of course there is the safety aspect. I'm fortunate that I've only seen one driver killed as a result of a crash on a race weekend; it was thorough unpleasant to watch and I don't ever wish to experience that again. If I'd been watching in the 60s and 70s when such an event was all too regular, I'd have probably lost interest.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 2:55 pm 
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Johnson wrote:
These types are questions usually yield the result of the best era is the era I started watching in.

Were the races even broadcast before the mid 1970’s? How could that be your favourite era if you couldn’t even watch the races?


Even here in the USA & North Americans, some of us learned to read, even if the magazine's were received a month or two after the race was run. Occasionally as even saw start-ups in sports programs. There were usually a couple of races shown on TV, the USGP(s) and Monaco. We also had some sports car races such as Sebring and parts of LeMans, NASCAR and Always the Indy 500.

I would imagine some of our European volunteering to see even more, plus attend a few races, same for South Africans and South Americans.

You see some of even lived in that era... And some even research an era.

:nod:

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:37 pm 
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j man wrote:
Every era has had its good points and bad points. As someone who started watching in the mid 90s, I still find so much to admire about the older eras: the immense bravery of the drivers, the genuine innovation and ingenuity that went into engineering the cars, and that the rulebook could pretty much be written on the back of a cigarette packet. But from a fan's perspective, was it actually watchable? Media coverage was minimal, race circuits were poorly designed (often around existing public roads) and gave little consideration to the concerns of the paying spectator, and the downside of the loose regulations and diversity of engineering concepts was that the sport wasn't particularly competitive and the cars were incredibly spread out. For instance I took a race at random (the 1964 British Grand Prix) and saw that only the top three finished on the same lap, of whom Surtees in third place finished a whopping 80 seconds behind the winner Clark. What good are cars that are good racing wheel-to-wheel if they are so far apart on track that they rarely even encounter each other? And then half the field didn't even finish because their cars broke down.

In my view F1 is as good now as it's ever been. It's certainly not perfect by any means and there are plenty of aspects of current F1 that I don't like: the political power of the top teams who wield it only to serve their own financial interests, the over-zealous focus on component conservation and enforced cost-saving, the use of artificial methods to promote overtaking without attempting to address the fundamental issue of over-reliance on aerodynamics, and the move to pay TV to name a few. But there is so much that is better than ever:
- The incredible media coverage that means we don't miss anything that happens on track. We get to hear from the drivers before, after and even during the race. We can discuss the finer details of the weekend's events with total strangers on an internet forum.
- The races are no longer a reliability lottery. I hate seeing races decided by issues outside the driver's control, and in my view breakdowns and mechanical problems played far too big a role in the past.
- We do have more overtaking and more wheel-to-wheel racing than at any time since the proliferation of complex aerodynamics in the 90s, even if I'm not massively enamored with how it has been achieved.
- The races are competitive, particularly in the midfield, and the field spread is relatively small compared to the past.
- I like a lot of the modern race tracks; they are safe, wide enough to promote overtaking and are designed with the spectators in mind. Most of the dull races we get nowadays are down to the cars rather than the circuits and there are only a couple (i.e. Sochi and Abu Dhabi) that I think are poorly designed.
- Finally of course there is the safety aspect. I'm fortunate that I've only seen one driver killed as a result of a crash on a race weekend; it was thorough unpleasant to watch and I don't ever wish to experience that again. If I'd been watching in the 60s and 70s when such an event was all too regular, I'd have probably lost interest.

There's a lot of truth to what you've said here though it won't be popular with some. The part about competitiveness is the most important one for me. It never ceases to amaze me how people make arguments for Fangio as the greatest of all time without ever understanding that his cars were often 4 seconds faster than the field! Nowadays, when a car has a few tenths on the field we all die of boredom. The sport back in the early days was 100 times more dangerous and 100 times less competitive. If we replaced today's F1 with that version of it, it would lose most of it's fans.

The one thing I would point out is that the 80s and 90s were somewhat similar to today but with cars that were better for racing wheel to wheel (minus the gimmick of DRS). For me, that was the sweet spot. Okay reliability was a lot worse back then but DRS racing really bugs me. I also dislike racing with an automatic gearbox.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:03 pm 
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Johnson wrote:
These types are questions usually yield the result of the best era is the era I started watching in.

Were the races even broadcast before the mid 1970’s? How could that be your favourite era if you couldn’t even watch the races?


Most F1 races were filmed by host broadcasters. Monaco and British were regulars, along with a few others per season. Highlights of most of the races were broadcast, along with regular scrambling, tin tops, speedway, road races, IOM, grass track, etc. Attendance was cheap.
Within 45 mins of my home were a couple of speedway tracks, numerous banger race tracks, Lydden Hill, Brands Hatch, Buckmore Park. and dozens of scrambling and grass track events on temporary tracks. Brands and Lydden were also used as training tracks, and Iwade and Hackney as speedway training tracks. I would guess I attended 2 to 4 meetings per week during late 60s, early 70s. So yea, no slow motion, no instant replays, and no online telemetry available at the touch of a button; but we did manage to watch or participate in a bit of racing. Enough to have an opinion anyway.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:06 pm 
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Sorry I did not read the title properly. I thought it said F1 and not all Motorsport since all the answers that I read were with regards to F1.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:20 pm 
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j man wrote:
Every era has had its good points and bad points. As someone who started watching in the mid 90s, I still find so much to admire about the older eras: the immense bravery of the drivers, the genuine innovation and ingenuity that went into engineering the cars, and that the rulebook could pretty much be written on the back of a cigarette packet. But from a fan's perspective, was it actually watchable? Media coverage was minimal, race circuits were poorly designed (often around existing public roads) and gave little consideration to the concerns of the paying spectator, and the downside of the loose regulations and diversity of engineering concepts was that the sport wasn't particularly competitive and the cars were incredibly spread out. For instance I took a race at random (the 1964 British Grand Prix) and saw that only the top three finished on the same lap, of whom Surtees in third place finished a whopping 80 seconds behind the winner Clark. What good are cars that are good racing wheel-to-wheel if they are so far apart on track that they rarely even encounter each other? And then half the field didn't even finish because their cars broke down.

In my view F1 is as good now as it's ever been. It's certainly not perfect by any means and there are plenty of aspects of current F1 that I don't like: the political power of the top teams who wield it only to serve their own financial interests, the over-zealous focus on component conservation and enforced cost-saving, the use of artificial methods to promote overtaking without attempting to address the fundamental issue of over-reliance on aerodynamics, and the move to pay TV to name a few. But there is so much that is better than ever:
- The incredible media coverage that means we don't miss anything that happens on track. We get to hear from the drivers before, after and even during the race. We can discuss the finer details of the weekend's events with total strangers on an internet forum.
- The races are no longer a reliability lottery. I hate seeing races decided by issues outside the driver's control, and in my view breakdowns and mechanical problems played far too big a role in the past.
- We do have more overtaking and more wheel-to-wheel racing than at any time since the proliferation of complex aerodynamics in the 90s, even if I'm not massively enamored with how it has been achieved.
- The races are competitive, particularly in the midfield, and the field spread is relatively small compared to the past.
- I like a lot of the modern race tracks; they are safe, wide enough to promote overtaking and are designed with the spectators in mind. Most of the dull races we get nowadays are down to the cars rather than the circuits and there are only a couple (i.e. Sochi and Abu Dhabi) that I think are poorly designed.
- Finally of course there is the safety aspect. I'm fortunate that I've only seen one driver killed as a result of a crash on a race weekend; it was thorough unpleasant to watch and I don't ever wish to experience that again. If I'd been watching in the 60s and 70s when such an event was all too regular, I'd have probably lost interest.


Completely agree, people remember everything good about the past but tend to forget the worse bits.

In the late 1990's, plenty complained it wasn't as good as the eighties. 10 years later, you had the same "not as good as the nineties". In 10 years time people will say "its not as good as the 10s when you had legends like Vettel and Hamilton". Its will always be the same and generally people love it most around the time they first really got into it.

Re-watch races from the 80s and 90s, baring the odd classic, the viewing experience is not great. There is no live timing, there is no on screen gaps. You only get gaps from the top 6 and only ever then every 5 or 6 laps. You basically have no idea at all what is occurring in the midfield or how the race is unfolding back there.

The commentary is also terrible - no discussion of tactics, under cuts, fresh tyre advantage, tyre delta between compounds. The sport has come a long way in terms of the viewing experience from around the mid 2000's.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:39 pm 
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j man wrote:
Every era has had its good points and bad points. As someone who started watching in the mid 90s, I still find so much to admire about the older eras: the immense bravery of the drivers, the genuine innovation and ingenuity that went into engineering the cars, and that the rulebook could pretty much be written on the back of a cigarette packet. But from a fan's perspective, was it actually watchable? Media coverage was minimal, race circuits were poorly designed (often around existing public roads) and gave little consideration to the concerns of the paying spectator, and the downside of the loose regulations and diversity of engineering concepts was that the sport wasn't particularly competitive and the cars were incredibly spread out. For instance I took a race at random (the 1964 British Grand Prix) and saw that only the top three finished on the same lap, of whom Surtees in third place finished a whopping 80 seconds behind the winner Clark. What good are cars that are good racing wheel-to-wheel if they are so far apart on track that they rarely even encounter each other? And then half the field didn't even finish because their cars broke down.

In my view F1 is as good now as it's ever been. It's certainly not perfect by any means and there are plenty of aspects of current F1 that I don't like: the political power of the top teams who wield it only to serve their own financial interests, the over-zealous focus on component conservation and enforced cost-saving, the use of artificial methods to promote overtaking without attempting to address the fundamental issue of over-reliance on aerodynamics, and the move to pay TV to name a few. But there is so much that is better than ever:
- The incredible media coverage that means we don't miss anything that happens on track. We get to hear from the drivers before, after and even during the race. We can discuss the finer details of the weekend's events with total strangers on an internet forum.
- The races are no longer a reliability lottery. I hate seeing races decided by issues outside the driver's control, and in my view breakdowns and mechanical problems played far too big a role in the past.
- We do have more overtaking and more wheel-to-wheel racing than at any time since the proliferation of complex aerodynamics in the 90s, even if I'm not massively enamored with how it has been achieved.
- The races are competitive, particularly in the midfield, and the field spread is relatively small compared to the past.
- I like a lot of the modern race tracks; they are safe, wide enough to promote overtaking and are designed with the spectators in mind. Most of the dull races we get nowadays are down to the cars rather than the circuits and there are only a couple (i.e. Sochi and Abu Dhabi) that I think are poorly designed.
- Finally of course there is the safety aspect. I'm fortunate that I've only seen one driver killed as a result of a crash on a race weekend; it was thorough unpleasant to watch and I don't ever wish to experience that again. If I'd been watching in the 60s and 70s when such an event was all too regular, I'd have probably lost interest.


I think some of those positives with this era are really big positives like Safety, the media coverage and the tighter spread especially in the midfield but I don't think reliability is, I think we've gone too far the other way with that as the problem of lining up the cars in order of who's quickest gets compounded by not much chance of reliability issues so we get increased processional races with not much happening and the chances of a smaller team pulling off a win or even a podium are all but non existent these days because of the near bulletproof reliability.

I think some of the negatives of this era not already mentioned are equally big as well though.

-Performance locked in throughout the year. We don't really see much shuffle of the competitive order anymore, no real B-Specs and once your team has a bad winter testing you can pretty much write of not just the year but multiple years until the next rules change
-Limited Manufacturer interest. Budget and infrastructure wise there are only 3 teams that have been able to win for what will be 7 seasons by the end of this V6-T era with only 6 competitive seats and we can pretty much say that for the next two seasons as well unless Renault double their budget which is unlikely. This situation will likely lead to one of the best drivers on the grid leaving the sport this year and that's not a great advert for any era. Even in era's where racing was not much better than this one we still had multiple big budget manufacturers that at least gave the feeling/hope that they could get it right by even the next race under free testing. We can write off years now at winter testing which is probably the single biggest negative, it's just all too predictable which is never good in sport.


I think the two eras sandman and KingVoid mentioned, late 80's/early 90's and 2000's found the best blend for much of the reasons they mentioned so one of those would get my vote.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:02 pm 
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Johnson wrote:
These types are questions usually yield the result of the best era is the era I started watching in.

Were the races even broadcast before the mid 1970’s? How could that be your favourite era if you couldn’t even watch the races?

I wasn't alive in the 1960s, so it's entirely possible I have a romanticized idea of it in some ways. But the reasons I picked it for my favorite era - the unfettered push of technology, the way the cars look and (at least in simulations) drive, the way the drivers handled themselves - are reasons I can hold objectively despite not having watched any of it. If this were about the most exciting season to watch on TV you'd have a point, but favorite era doesn't have to be the same thing.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:26 pm 
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Exactly, my favourite era of music certainly isn't the era I first listened to music in.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:51 pm 
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Lotus49 wrote:
Exactly, my favourite era of music certainly isn't the era I first listened to music in.


I dont think that is a fair comparison, a song is a song. It doesn't have good and bad aspect.

Research shows your music tastes though are quite linked to the music you liked in your formative years 14-21.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:58 pm 
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Mille Miglia, Carrera Panamericana, GP of Pescara, Targa Florio etc etc etc.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:09 pm 
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Johnson wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
Exactly, my favourite era of music certainly isn't the era I first listened to music in.


I dont think that is a fair comparison, a song is a song. It doesn't have good and bad aspect.

Research shows your music tastes though are quite linked to the music you liked in your formative years 14-21.


Well an era of music can have both bad and good aspects though. You can like the 60's without having to like every band and every song, it's just a general statement.

Sounds interesting, my taste varied quite a bit during that period.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:32 pm 
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80s and 90s for me.

But that is mainly because I was old enough to go to races by then and young enough to be able to afford it before kids and responsibilities came along!

I started watching F1 regularly in the mid-late 80s and (for my sins) have supported Williams ever since. I went all the British GPs between 1987 and 1994. I also used to go to Thruxton regularly (only a few miles up the road from me) and watch whatever was on, be it Touring cars, single seaters, pre-65s, I didn't care, I just loved watching live racing.

The 80s also heralded the amazing Group B rally cars that were just mental!

So yeah, purely from a nostalgia point of view, I have to choose 80s and 90s :)


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:46 pm 
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For me it runs from the mid 80s to the mid 90's.

I started watching F1 seriously in 1984 when Senna first entered and went to the British GP that same year, when Senna died in 1994 it took some of the shine off it plus then we had Schumacher basically racing against tier 2 drivers, all the champions were no longer around, Senna, Prost, Piquet, even Mansell.

Same with CART which I loved watching, the races were more entertaining than F1 and you had the young guns that were the stand outs, Michael Andretti and Al Unser Jr, plus some F1 royalty, Mario Andretti and Fittipaldi, this series got split in the mid 90s which was I guess the start of its demise although it did remain relative strong to the end of the 90s with my interest being in the European schooled drivers Alex Zanardi and Montoya, plus you the can also throw in Franchitti.

Then in 500c GP racing the mid 80s were dominated by the great American riders, Spencer, Lawson, Rainey and Schwantz, by the time Doohan started winning in the mid 90s all these great riders were gone with Doohan just beating tier 2 riders and then Rossi basically carrying on after that for a few years against some more tier 2 riders.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 2:12 pm 
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Asphalt_World wrote:
Mille Miglia, Carrera Panamericana, GP of Pescara, Targa Florio etc etc etc.


:thumbup:

Wonderful era for sports cars... Only wish we could have had today's media sources back then. Road & Track and Sports Car Graphic were monthly "must reads"

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 5:32 pm 
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I voted for the 70's because the innovation was extremely creative then and still on a level ordinary people like me could understand.

Renault introduced the turbo-engine, which started out as the laughing stock of the formula 1 world
Colin Chapman introduced Ground Effect, which made the black JPS livery Lotus 78 and 79 unbeatable
Brabham introduced the Vacuum-attachment to their car to achieve the same effect as the Lotus' had, but it was banned because it blew a cloud of dust and small gravel in the face of the following car
Tyrrell introduced the six wheel Formula 1 car, but it never really worked out as planned

Today everything is so complicated, that the engine no longer is an engine, but a power unit with ERS, MGU-H, MGU-K etc.

Back then the driver made the decisions, and the only information he would get from the pit was a few letters and numbers on a big board when he passed the pit. Today the car is an extention of an army of highly skilled engineers monitoring, adjusting and changing the car while it's racing, and then telling the driver on radio what they can read on their computers.

And in the 70's Monaco was actually a race, where is was possible to overtake. Not like today, when it is a boring train of cars, with the winner decided after the first corner.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 8:13 am 
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Beleriand_K wrote:
I voted for the 70's because the innovation was extremely creative then and still on a level ordinary people like me could understand.

Renault introduced the turbo-engine, which started out as the laughing stock of the formula 1 world
Colin Chapman introduced Ground Effect, which made the black JPS livery Lotus 78 and 79 unbeatable
Brabham introduced the Vacuum-attachment to their car to achieve the same effect as the Lotus' had, but it was banned because it blew a cloud of dust and small gravel in the face of the following car
Tyrrell introduced the six wheel Formula 1 car, but it never really worked out as planned

Today everything is so complicated, that the engine no longer is an engine, but a power unit with ERS, MGU-H, MGU-K etc.

Back then the driver made the decisions, and the only information he would get from the pit was a few letters and numbers on a big board when he passed the pit. Today the car is an extention of an army of highly skilled engineers monitoring, adjusting and changing the car while it's racing, and then telling the driver on radio what they can read on their computers.

And in the 70's Monaco was actually a race, where is was possible to overtake. Not like today, when it is a boring train of cars, with the winner decided after the first corner.


I suspect that the folks from the 30's thought the same about the 70's cars!! Ground effects? Nah, stick 4 wheels on an engine and you have a car!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:27 pm 
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I vote 90's because it's the only time American Open Wheel was on the elite level with F1 in terms of tech, quality and variety of chassis and a multitude of engines.

CHASSIS
Penske
Lola
Reynard
Swift
Panoz

ENGINES
Ford Cosworth
Chevy
Honda
Toyota
Mercedes


As well, the sponsorship pool was vast and deep and not as dependent on a single industry the way F1 was with tobacco. There were certainly tobacco sponsors but there were other big ones such as LCI, Pioneer, Valvoline, Exxon, Kmart, Texaco, Havoline, Budweiser, Miller, Alumax, Shell, Target, JCPenny, Duracell, MCI, Tecate, Menard's, Firestone, Kodak, Glidden, Coors, Scotch/3M, and more. And with F1's financial climate much the same, the 90's was unquestionably the best ever era in motorsport.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 1:13 pm 
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My favorite ERA was the R2B but that was pre F1 World championship. My favourite ERA in F1 was probably the B-Type.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:48 pm 
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The 90's - terrible music, but the best decade for motorsport IMO.

The only time we saw Schumacher, Senna & Prost (3 of the top 5 in pretty much every GOAT list) racing competitively, sometimes even against each other. Add some exciting talent such as Mansell, Piquet, Hakkinen, even JV/Hill, and not-yet-bulletproof reliability, and it becomes an era where I really looked forward to watching every single race.


Last edited by A.J. on Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:22 pm 
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A.J. wrote:
The 90's - terrible music, but the best decade for motorsport IMO.

The only time we saw Schumacher, Senna & Prost (3 of the top 5 in pretty much every GOAT list) racing competitively, sometimes even against each other. Add some exciting talent such as Mansell, Piquet, even JV/Hill, and not-yet-bulletproof reliability, and it becomes an era where I really looked forward to watching every single race.


The grid looked great too. Lots of teams, lots of different aero and car concepts and colours, it looked amazing.

To be fair this year that's got a lot better than recently where it was just a collection of meh liveries on practically identical cars. We've got some different nose concepts, the Sauber looks especially different in other areas too and the liveries are pretty good too but it's not like the 80's and 90's.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:32 pm 
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A.J. wrote:
The 90's - terrible music, but the best decade for motorsport IMO.

The only time we saw Schumacher, Senna & Prost (3 of the top 5 in pretty much every GOAT list) racing competitively, sometimes even against each other. Add some exciting talent such as Mansell, Piquet, even JV/Hill, and not-yet-bulletproof reliability, and it becomes an era where I really looked forward to watching every single race.


Terrible music? Please leave the building immediately :twisted:

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:36 pm 
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Asphalt_World wrote:
A.J. wrote:
The 90's - terrible music, but the best decade for motorsport IMO.

The only time we saw Schumacher, Senna & Prost (3 of the top 5 in pretty much every GOAT list) racing competitively, sometimes even against each other. Add some exciting talent such as Mansell, Piquet, even JV/Hill, and not-yet-bulletproof reliability, and it becomes an era where I really looked forward to watching every single race.


Terrible music? Please leave the building immediately :twisted:


I grew up on it, so I still listen to it from time to time - can I please stay? :D


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:23 pm 
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A.J. wrote:
Asphalt_World wrote:
A.J. wrote:
The 90's - terrible music, but the best decade for motorsport IMO.

The only time we saw Schumacher, Senna & Prost (3 of the top 5 in pretty much every GOAT list) racing competitively, sometimes even against each other. Add some exciting talent such as Mansell, Piquet, even JV/Hill, and not-yet-bulletproof reliability, and it becomes an era where I really looked forward to watching every single race.


Terrible music? Please leave the building immediately :twisted:


I grew up on it, so I still listen to it from time to time - can I please stay? :D


OK, I'll let you. The 90's was my teen / 20's era and I am still obsessed with Britpop to this day. Still go to gigs for either real Britpop bands or tribute bands. Just love it!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:47 pm 
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KingVoid wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
If it's not an outlier then you have to consider Verstappen as being the fastest driver in F1 and by a margin, common sense points it more towards being an outlier.


That would depend on exactly how "slow" Vettel is wouldn't it.

Well taking 2014 at face value it would make Vettel 0.34s slower than Verstappen. 8O

Vettel himself with cross referencing is no more than 0.08s slower than Alonso.

Until we see Verstappen against someone else we just can't rule out him being that fast ;)

There is a good chance that Verstappen is already the fastest driver in Formula 1. He is currently beating Ricciardo 9-3 in qualifying. For reference, Hamilton is only beating Bottas 7-5. Most of us would agree that Ricciardo is at least as good as Bottas.

It’s difficult to compare but it would not surprise me in the least.

You're just comparing a 6 month sample though, last year would paint a different picture although I guess we have to bear in mind that Bottas was new to the Mercedes team, Kimi had a stand out qualifying year against Vettel in 2016.

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