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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 12:54 am 
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I noticed this idea in the driver's responsibility during overtaking thread, and there didn't seem to be any resolution on this particular part of the discussion.

Isn't the way to defend against a divebomb to simply block fully up the inside of the corner? It's when you don't cover the inside line that you leave yourself open to either (i) a well judged out-braking maneuver by the attacking car or (ii) an overshooting attacker that has braked too late to complete a clean pass whilst remaining on track.

If you don't want to expose yourself to (i) or (ii) then block the inside line. If instead you think your opponent is too far back to pass you, by all means take a risk by 'leaving the door open' for them and either (a) just turn in normally if you are well ahead by the apex, (like Schumacher vs Hill in Britain 1995 or Bottas vs Raikkonen in Russia 2015), or (b) if the divebomber has got his car mostly alongside you by the apex, you have now possibly 'lost the corner' and so instead should delay your turn in and allow your opponent to overshoot the corner/complete their well judged pass.

Anyway, please discuss.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 1:10 am 
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It depends. A well-timed one is pretty hard to defend against, as is any good overtaking move. If it's a case of a driver flying up the inside and missing his/her braking point, then hanging onto the racing line and being ready to swoop back by when they go too deep is pretty traditional.

Really it's down to what you mean as a "dive bomb". Is it a reckless let-me-by-or-we-both-crash move, or is it a well-timed attempt from some way back?

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 1:26 am 
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Toby. wrote:
It depends. A well-timed one is pretty hard to defend against, as is any good overtaking move. If it's a case of a driver flying up the inside and missing his/her braking point, then hanging onto the racing line and being ready to swoop back by when they go too deep is pretty traditional.

Really it's down to what you mean as a "dive bomb". Is it a reckless let-me-by-or-we-both-crash move, or is it a well-timed attempt from some way back?


Well this is what the defending driver needs to determine themselves, and if the defender gets it wrong, then they are to blame for any crash, (e.g. Schumacher misjudging the overtaking attempt by Villeneuve in Jerez 1997, the German assuming that Jacques was too far back to be able to pass him correctly and he was wrong about that as JV would not have overshot the corner and actually would have pulled off a great overtake).

If the defending driver is not good at judging these situations then he needs to overblock towards the inside of corners, at the slight cost of race time due to his lack of judgement.

Again back to Jerez 1997, Schumacher should have been blocking the inside line of the Dry Sac corner on every single lap till the end of the race; even if he thought Villeneuve was too many car lengths back on any given lap, block the inside line anyway. This would have cost both MS and JV lap time but the corners immediately following Dry Sac are not overtaking spots and JV would not have been able to pass MS as a result of MS taking Dry Sac corner slowly with a sub-optimal line.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 2:13 am 
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Anti-Aircraft flak???

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:12 am 
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Depending on the corner, if you take the inside line too early then surely you don't have the optimal line for the corner. You cannot really defend a well timed "dive bomb", I fully agree with Toby's post.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 2:47 pm 
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Siao7 wrote:
Depending on the corner, if you take the inside line too early then surely you don't have the optimal line for the corner. You cannot really defend a well timed "dive bomb", I fully agree with Toby's post.


Yes, taking the inside line for a corner is pretty much always sub-optimal and you wouldn't do it if an attacking car is 5 seconds behind you say.

However you can always defend against a divebomb by blocking the inside line. Do you agree that at the vast majority of corners you can't divebomb someone down the outside? If you agree, then block the inside line and then they can't divebomb you. Accept the time loss from the sub-optimal line as that is what you are investing in your divebomb defense. Most of these Danny Ric divebombs could have been prevented by the guy in front not leaving the door open for him. They elected not to cover the inside because they incorrectly calculated that Danny Ric was too far back to make a passing attempt, and that's on them and not Danny.

Prost could have done the same in Japan 1989, not leave the door open like that, but a collision wasn't so bad for him of course and he cheated by crashing into a rival.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 3:31 pm 
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Not sure you can block off the inside comprehensively nowadays as quite often track limits are ignored with only two wheels staying on tack, I would much prefer zero tolerance on track limits, then at least you can tell which line to defend.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 3:40 pm 
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Option or Prime wrote:
Not sure you can block off the inside comprehensively nowadays as quite often track limits are ignored with only two wheels staying on tack, I would much prefer zero tolerance on track limits, then at least you can tell which line to defend.


Vettel blocked off the inside comprehensively at turn 1 in Russia 2018 to stop Hamilton passing.

For some silly reason Vettel did not block the inside properly at the next corner however and Hamilton out-raced him and passed him; but it was possible to cover the inside there and Vettel failed to do it.

Defensive driving is still the same now as it always was, (in terms of what is required of the defending driver).


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