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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:57 pm 
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Following on from Silverstone extending its contract to host the British grand prix last week. Liberty media and motorsport Australia have announced a new contract to host the Australian grand prix. (Presumably Albert park. But it's not actually set in stone it is Albert park) this contract sees the australian grand prix stay on the calendar until 2025.

BBC. Crash net and sky sports are my sources for this.

Some good news and keeps a great season opener on the calendar for another 6 years.


Thoughts????


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 10:45 pm 
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It's not a great season opener though, its s street track and I would drop it from the calender.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 10:58 pm 
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F1_Ernie wrote:
It's not a great season opener though, its s street track and I would drop it from the calender.


Street track doesn't automatically mean bad.

I like Albert Park - pleased to see it is staying around.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:23 pm 
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I like it, but I don't feel it's the right track to open the season with. Every single year it leads to moaning about how hard it is to overtake. If it were a few races in, with some overtake-fest like Bahrain to actually open the season, I think we'd see a lot less complaining.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 8:37 am 
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Exediron wrote:
I like it, but I don't feel it's the right track to open the season with. Every single year it leads to moaning about how hard it is to overtake. If it were a few races in, with some overtake-fest like Bahrain to actually open the season, I think we'd see a lot less complaining.


Yeah I completely agree. It's also a fairly unrepresentative track that often doesn't really give us a good idea of the true pecking order.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 8:51 am 
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Lojik wrote:
Exediron wrote:
I like it, but I don't feel it's the right track to open the season with. Every single year it leads to moaning about how hard it is to overtake. If it were a few races in, with some overtake-fest like Bahrain to actually open the season, I think we'd see a lot less complaining.


Yeah I completely agree. It's also a fairly unrepresentative track that often doesn't really give us a good idea of the true pecking order.


I think different tracks have suited different formula's. Albert Park often produced really good races before 2014 whilst Bahrain was usually a borefest before the cheese tyres of 2011.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:09 pm 
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Obviously pretty chuffed with the news.

Agree with comments on the track. The frustrating thing is that I think it'd be a fairly easy & reasonably inexpensive exercise to turn the track into one that could provide a few fairly good overtaking opportunities over the lap.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:55 pm 
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Jezza13 wrote:
Obviously pretty chuffed with the news.

Agree with comments on the track. The frustrating thing is that I think it'd be a fairly easy & reasonably inexpensive exercise to turn the track into one that could provide a few fairly good overtaking opportunities over the lap.

What changes would you make?

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:59 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
Lojik wrote:
Exediron wrote:
I like it, but I don't feel it's the right track to open the season with. Every single year it leads to moaning about how hard it is to overtake. If it were a few races in, with some overtake-fest like Bahrain to actually open the season, I think we'd see a lot less complaining.


Yeah I completely agree. It's also a fairly unrepresentative track that often doesn't really give us a good idea of the true pecking order.


I think different tracks have suited different formula's. Albert Park often produced really good races before 2014 whilst Bahrain was usually a borefest before the cheese tyres of 2011.


This is bang on IMO and I think its often underappreciated how much the regulations play a part in which circuits produce good races. Canada has been pretty dull a lot of the time in recent years, for example.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 1:03 am 
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P-F1 Mod wrote:
Jezza13 wrote:
Obviously pretty chuffed with the news.

Agree with comments on the track. The frustrating thing is that I think it'd be a fairly easy & reasonably inexpensive exercise to turn the track into one that could provide a few fairly good overtaking opportunities over the lap.

What changes would you make?


Image
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Grand_Prix#/media/File:Albert_Lake_Park_Street_Circuit_in_Melbourne,_Australia.svg

Well i'd start by removing turns 1 & 2. That section could easily be turned into a high speed, slight kink effectively turning turn 3 into turn 1.

Turns 9 & 10 can be smoothed out into another high speed kink.

From turn 13 to the finish line there's a couple of options to consider.

Option 1 - Cut out turn 15 & just continue a curve from turn 14 through to turn 16.

Option 2 - Continue straight on at turn 13 to a hairpin turn just out of the picture above. Then coming back near turn 14 continue the straight run forward to current turn 16. Combined this with the changes at turns 1 & 2, the track could pretty much have a main straight just over 2 km in length.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:16 pm 
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But, they track is on existing roads.

I mean I guess they could move the roads/have temporary roads?


What I'd most like F1 to do is move the race start time back to 13:00/14:00... Was visually more spectacular in the sun, its looked a dull with the 17:00 local time start.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:42 pm 
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It's good to keep the Australian GP, but the Albert Park circuit is terrible and I'd like to see them move to a different venue. Even if it's another street track, surely they can come up with something that gives better racing than what we have now.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:44 pm 
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I like the circuit more than a number of other ones. That said, it could do with 1 or 2 alterations to aid passing chances.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 7:42 am 
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j man wrote:
It's good to keep the Australian GP, but the Albert Park circuit is terrible and I'd like to see them move to a different venue. Even if it's another street track, surely they can come up with something that gives better racing than what we have now.


It's not terrible it just doesn't suit this formula. Before 2014 it produced lots of really good races. Hopefully from 2021 it will produce them again.

I've been noticing more and more how a change in regulations really seems to alter the effectiveness of various tracks. Post 2014 Albert Park, Monaco, Spa and Suzuka have all suffered producing much poorer races than before 2014. The Hungaroring ring and Bahrain on the other had have gone from being among the dullest tracks to some of the most exciting since the introduction of cheese tyres in 2011.

With that in mind I don't think tracks should be designed to produce good racing (you just end up with every track feeling the same). They should be designed to provide a challenge for the drivers.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 8:18 am 
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Seanie wrote:
But, they track is on existing roads.

I mean I guess they could move the roads/have temporary roads?


What I'd most like F1 to do is move the race start time back to 13:00/14:00... Was visually more spectacular in the sun, its looked a dull with the 17:00 local time start.


Yeah it's on existing roads but its surrounded mostly by sporting fields.

Relatively straight forward to modify the track but I think bureaucracy & green tape would kibosh any changes.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 10:25 am 
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Jezza13 wrote:
P-F1 Mod wrote:
Jezza13 wrote:
Obviously pretty chuffed with the news.

Agree with comments on the track. The frustrating thing is that I think it'd be a fairly easy & reasonably inexpensive exercise to turn the track into one that could provide a few fairly good overtaking opportunities over the lap.

What changes would you make?


Image
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Grand_Prix#/media/File:Albert_Lake_Park_Street_Circuit_in_Melbourne,_Australia.svg

Well i'd start by removing turns 1 & 2. That section could easily be turned into a high speed, slight kink effectively turning turn 3 into turn 1.

Turns 9 & 10 can be smoothed out into another high speed kink.

From turn 13 to the finish line there's a couple of options to consider.

Option 1 - Cut out turn 15 & just continue a curve from turn 14 through to turn 16.

Option 2 - Continue straight on at turn 13 to a hairpin turn just out of the picture above. Then coming back near turn 14 continue the straight run forward to current turn 16. Combined this with the changes at turns 1 & 2, the track could pretty much have a main straight just over 2 km in length.


The oz open is a fav with the drivers - often wins best broadcast of all GP - and suffers more from being where teams are still developing cars - I would extend the straight at 13 into a hairpin further down road and make a longer sweeping straight into the second last turn before the start/finish straight - and will suggest this to GP organisers as the track surface should be resurfaced in parts before 2020


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 8:25 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
j man wrote:
It's good to keep the Australian GP, but the Albert Park circuit is terrible and I'd like to see them move to a different venue. Even if it's another street track, surely they can come up with something that gives better racing than what we have now.


It's not terrible it just doesn't suit this formula. Before 2014 it produced lots of really good races. Hopefully from 2021 it will produce them again.

I've been noticing more and more how a change in regulations really seems to alter the effectiveness of various tracks. Post 2014 Albert Park, Monaco, Spa and Suzuka have all suffered producing much poorer races than before 2014. The Hungaroring ring and Bahrain on the other had have gone from being among the dullest tracks to some of the most exciting since the introduction of cheese tyres in 2011.

With that in mind I don't think tracks should be designed to produce good racing (you just end up with every track feeling the same). They should be designed to provide a challenge for the drivers.

That is a fair point, though I must say I can't recall many memorable races from Albert Park that weren't weather related (I'm thinking 2010). Monaco I don't like but its cause has not been helped by the fragile tyres; once tyre conservation became the name of the game and drivers stopped pushing during the race the prospect of driving mistakes evaporated. For the others though I think DRS is actually the biggest factor, in particular Bahrain (the straights were never quite long enough for good slipstreaming) and Spa (passing down the Kemmel straight is now such a formality that the race has become more of a time trial). In the case of Albert Park though, the straights just aren't long enough even for DRS to be effective and there just aren't any really significant braking zones.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:43 pm 
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j man wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
j man wrote:
It's good to keep the Australian GP, but the Albert Park circuit is terrible and I'd like to see them move to a different venue. Even if it's another street track, surely they can come up with something that gives better racing than what we have now.


It's not terrible it just doesn't suit this formula. Before 2014 it produced lots of really good races. Hopefully from 2021 it will produce them again.

I've been noticing more and more how a change in regulations really seems to alter the effectiveness of various tracks. Post 2014 Albert Park, Monaco, Spa and Suzuka have all suffered producing much poorer races than before 2014. The Hungaroring ring and Bahrain on the other had have gone from being among the dullest tracks to some of the most exciting since the introduction of cheese tyres in 2011.

With that in mind I don't think tracks should be designed to produce good racing (you just end up with every track feeling the same). They should be designed to provide a challenge for the drivers.

That is a fair point, though I must say I can't recall many memorable races from Albert Park that weren't weather related (I'm thinking 2010). Monaco I don't like but its cause has not been helped by the fragile tyres; once tyre conservation became the name of the game and drivers stopped pushing during the race the prospect of driving mistakes evaporated. For the others though I think DRS is actually the biggest factor, in particular Bahrain (the straights were never quite long enough for good slipstreaming) and Spa (passing down the Kemmel straight is now such a formality that the race has become more of a time trial). In the case of Albert Park though, the straights just aren't long enough even for DRS to be effective and there just aren't any really significant braking zones.


2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012 were all good races at Albert Park.

You make a good point about DRS possibly being a factor. When did we first get DRS?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 6:21 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
j man wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
j man wrote:
It's good to keep the Australian GP, but the Albert Park circuit is terrible and I'd like to see them move to a different venue. Even if it's another street track, surely they can come up with something that gives better racing than what we have now.


It's not terrible it just doesn't suit this formula. Before 2014 it produced lots of really good races. Hopefully from 2021 it will produce them again.

I've been noticing more and more how a change in regulations really seems to alter the effectiveness of various tracks. Post 2014 Albert Park, Monaco, Spa and Suzuka have all suffered producing much poorer races than before 2014. The Hungaroring ring and Bahrain on the other had have gone from being among the dullest tracks to some of the most exciting since the introduction of cheese tyres in 2011.

With that in mind I don't think tracks should be designed to produce good racing (you just end up with every track feeling the same). They should be designed to provide a challenge for the drivers.

That is a fair point, though I must say I can't recall many memorable races from Albert Park that weren't weather related (I'm thinking 2010). Monaco I don't like but its cause has not been helped by the fragile tyres; once tyre conservation became the name of the game and drivers stopped pushing during the race the prospect of driving mistakes evaporated. For the others though I think DRS is actually the biggest factor, in particular Bahrain (the straights were never quite long enough for good slipstreaming) and Spa (passing down the Kemmel straight is now such a formality that the race has become more of a time trial). In the case of Albert Park though, the straights just aren't long enough even for DRS to be effective and there just aren't any really significant braking zones.


2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012 were all good races at Albert Park.

You make a good point about DRS possibly being a factor. When did we first get DRS?

2011 I believe, in the wake of Alonso getting stuck behind Petrov in Abu Dhabi, so the same year as the Pirelli tyres came in. I guess both are a factor, certainly circuits with high tyre wear such as Shanghai will have been affected by the Pirellis. Come to think of it, I don't think there's been a dull Chinese GP since Pirelli came in.


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