planetf1.com

It is currently Fri Sep 19, 2014 9:50 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 6:27 am
Posts: 602
Hey guys wuddup, could you help me out here? I'm currently looking for a course in automotive industry but the problem is I also like to do computer science.

Therefore, I made my mind up by combining these two I would get the best of of both worlds. Problem is, I don't know which course to choose(engineering or computer science?) and would automotive computer technician be the best job to get after I finished my studies? I finished my O-Levels(well we don't call it that way here, but I put it in a term that you might understand) and waiting for my results..

_________________
Latest F1 vid I made http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C4qJXyRLDg&feature=youtu.be


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:14 pm
Posts: 1533
Do computer science since its what you sound like will enjoy and be good at. Computer science is still a form of engineering and car companies will need people to develop their infotainment systems.

Cars are ever more software dependent are there should be work for you available.

_________________
Lewis Hamilton Fan's Mood Race by Race: :( 8) 8) 8) 8) :evil: :-(( :) :D :proud: ;) x( 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:53 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 6:27 am
Posts: 602
^I was thinking that if I take up computer science I would not be able to use it to go into automotive engineering. I thought that I needed to take a course in automotive in order to get into the automotive industry even though I have finished my degree in computer science. Thanks for that info :)

_________________
Latest F1 vid I made http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C4qJXyRLDg&feature=youtu.be


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 12:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:14 pm
Posts: 1533
Nah you dont need to do a specialist course in automotive, it could help your chances but its not essential so dont worry. Especially if its in a specialist area such as the software side of things... which I can guarantee Mechanical engineers won't be much skilled at.

_________________
Lewis Hamilton Fan's Mood Race by Race: :( 8) 8) 8) 8) :evil: :-(( :) :D :proud: ;) x( 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 2:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 31, 2010 6:41 pm
Posts: 6587
When you say Automotive industry what or maybe more where do you mean?

The automotive industry is an umbrella that covers many facets.

When you say
Quote:
automotive computer technician


Do you mean at dealership level or Manufacturer design level?

If it's dealership level IME it's just a mechanic. When I did my Qualis they had ditched things like Autospark and put it all under one. You get specialists yes but they just came up through the usual mechanic ranks. Changing oil filters like anyone else.

_________________
Disclaimer: The above post maybe tongue in cheek.

"I thought I'd get your theories, mock them, then embrace my own. The usual."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 2:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 6:27 am
Posts: 602
Quote:
Do you mean at dealership level or Manufacturer design level?
I have no idea what that means, please tell me.

I want to be the guy that handles the computer stuff inside of the car, like the dashboard, radio player and etc2. I don't mind having to work on the interior of the car like the engine I just want to confirm that if I take computer science I would be able to get involved in using computer as a tool to work with cars as my job.

_________________
Latest F1 vid I made http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C4qJXyRLDg&feature=youtu.be


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 3:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 31, 2010 6:41 pm
Posts: 6587
If you are talking as in repair at the car dealer ship as in the workshop.

You are looking at having to start as an mechanic apprentice. at least in the UK. You'll likely start at the bottom sweeping floors and changing spark plugs.

IME computer science will do you no good in that environment because they usually send mechanics on the relevant specialised training courses to do the job.

_________________
Disclaimer: The above post maybe tongue in cheek.

"I thought I'd get your theories, mock them, then embrace my own. The usual."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 5:31 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:59 pm
Posts: 3349
Just to add to what Johnston has said, I'd recommend you do a mechanical or engineering course. If you are already interested in computer science, it is probably better to keep looking at it as a hobby. Lots of people are very competent at using computers whether it's simply understanding and using software or actually programming or designing and building machines, all without qualifications. Also to work in the automotive industry (again, in the UK at least) you do need to have the required engineering qualifications.

Hope that made sense, it doesn't read back all that well!

_________________
There is no theory of evolution, just a list of animals that Chuck Norris allows to live.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 31, 2010 6:41 pm
Posts: 6587
Something else too that may or may not apply.

I did Mechanics. Eventually ended up on trucks. One of the guys I worked with went to university and did a degree in computers. He didn't have a job lined up when he finished. Due to the competitiveness of the job market in that area there were more candidates than jobs.

Wasn't too long until he was effectively being told in interviews his degree was out of date as computers had moved on so much and wasn't worth anything. When we crossed paths I was the "Grease monkey" earning more money with more job opportunities because of my qualis and experience as a mechanic. He ended up retraining as something else.

_________________
Disclaimer: The above post maybe tongue in cheek.

"I thought I'd get your theories, mock them, then embrace my own. The usual."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:14 pm
Posts: 1533
Kolby wrote:
Quote:
Do you mean at dealership level or Manufacturer design level?
I have no idea what that means, please tell me.

I want to be the guy that handles the computer stuff inside of the car, like the dashboard, radio player and etc2. I don't mind having to work on the interior of the car like the engine I just want to confirm that if I take computer science I would be able to get involved in using computer as a tool to work with cars as my job.


I think Johnston is asking whether you want to work in a garage maintaining/repairing cars or if you want to join the OEMs and design the parts/system outright.

I believe you want to work and design future products right? In that case computer sciences will do you just fine. In my university Computer Science was a legit engineering course. There are so many networks in cars now, huge amount of sensors and relays, plus connectivity in cars is a massive thing these days due to smart phones/tablets, you'll be fine going in as a software engineer. It is such a growing segment in the auto industry.

Reading the other posts, it may sound like they're devaluing your degree in computer science, but I know what courses like yours teach. Don't let anyone tell you, your course isn't good enough (make it stand out in CVs and your interviews). You know this better than the rest of us, but Computer Science isn't just about using some software or coding little flash games. Your skill in building and managing robust systems is what sets you out from amateurs, you know the science behind it and can design far better.

Sorry Minchy but your analogy was kinda ill-informed. Someone could quite easily say lots of people are are very competent at using cars whether its simply driving different vehicles or repairing and building one from scratch, all without qualifications. Especially as Computer Science is regarded as an engineering course anyway.

_________________
Lewis Hamilton Fan's Mood Race by Race: :( 8) 8) 8) 8) :evil: :-(( :) :D :proud: ;) x( 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 31, 2010 6:41 pm
Posts: 6587
Don't think anyones devalued it Madman, it just depends on circumstances and the actual objectives.

_________________
Disclaimer: The above post maybe tongue in cheek.

"I thought I'd get your theories, mock them, then embrace my own. The usual."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 8:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:48 pm
Posts: 1461
Location: UK
I work in the automotive industry myself and I did a degree in Mechanical Engineering. My degree course (and I assume engineering courses at other universities are the same) allowed a great deal of flexibility and allowed people to specialise in any number of things, whether it was electronics/control systems, manufacturing technology, CAE, mechanical design or whatever. Personally I would recommend the engineering course as it is an attractive degree that allows you to get a job in a number of industries, even those unrelated to the contents of the course such as finance, as it demonstrates that you have a general competency in mathematics.

Then again, it's only natural that I would recommend the course I am familiar with ;)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:46 am 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:59 pm
Posts: 3349
@madman - just to reiterate what Johnston said. I'm not trying to devalue any kind of computing corse or degree, it's just an engineering degree has a lot more scope and differing applications in the job market. And as had been said there are many different specialties.

As far as having computer qualifications that are outdated or the competition is too high in the job market. I know a couple, 1 with a business and music management degree and the other with a PhD in some kind of physics (it's complicated and I never understand exactly what it is!) and both of them work at an Aviva call center as there's such high competition in the job market related to their qualifications. So it's always best to look at the long game and give yourself the best options for the future, especially as it looks like it'll take a long time for most of the world to recover from the current financial situation.

Another thing to take into consideration is that you can do numerous computer related degrees from home or in evening classes. Again, no disrespect to computer related degrees, but most engineering degrees require both hands on classroom (if that's the right word) experience and lecturing.

_________________
There is no theory of evolution, just a list of animals that Chuck Norris allows to live.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: minchy, Robbo-92 and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group