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 Post subject: Currently Reading....?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:17 pm 
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Mods: if there is a topic like this feel free to delete/merge. But I couldn't find one when I looked.

Since we have the Listening to thread for sharing music/bands we listen to, I thought it would be cool for a book one.

So, what books are the PF1 forum members reading?

I just finished re-reading Anne Rice's The Vampire Lestat. It's really good, once you can get over the language and the timeline jumping around a bit. I will probably re-read Queen of the Damned shortly, (I've never read past that book in this series, which I probably should) but now I'm taking a break and reading a collection of Neil Gaiman Short Stories.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:35 pm 
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I am re reading Huckleberry Finn. It is hilarious, but a good reminder what the mind set was not that long ago. We have progressed as a race despite what they say.

Well worth a read. Free from most places for ebook of phone


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:46 pm 
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This is my addiction for the moment

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:47 pm 
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Currently reading the fourth GoT book, struggling with this one though. Going to pick the up Wasp Factory though, really love that book and it's been too long.

I bought my dad Tolkein's new book for father's day. Interested to see how that one goes down!

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:22 pm 
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Saz - I'm afraid after she tore apart my girlfriend for daring to write an honest book review I will never touch anything written by Anne Rice.

I'm trying to find the time to read the Sally Lockhard series by Philip Pullman, but with work I just can't find that time. :(

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:39 pm 
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Two books, really.

The Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama, which is more of a contemplative process and takes more time to 'digest' than to actually read.

Since Ian Bank's passing over, I've started on The Player of Games again, one of my favourite sci-if novels and I haven't read it in decades :)

Wasp Factory might well be next. Love his early stuff.
But then again, I might pick up something by Bukowski.

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Last edited by Nakojo on Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:45 pm 
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Nakojo wrote:
Two books, really.

The Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama, which is more of a contemplative process and takes more time to 'digest' than to actually read.

Since Ian Bank's passing over, I've started on The Player of Games again, one of my favourite sci-if novels and I haven't read it in decades :)

Wasp Factory might well be next. Love his early stuff.


I've never read any of his sci-fi stuff but have one on my shelf to read. Have lost my copy of the Crow Road which is really annoying because it was the one I wanted to read after hearing he'd died.

Also just seen Jo Nesbo will be doing a signing in Manchester in September so will have to head down to that!

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:52 pm 
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Rachie_D wrote:
Nakojo wrote:
Two books, really.

The Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama, which is more of a contemplative process and takes more time to 'digest' than to actually read.

Since Ian Bank's passing over, I've started on The Player of Games again, one of my favourite sci-if novels and I haven't read it in decades :)

Wasp Factory might well be next. Love his early stuff.


I've never read any of his sci-fi stuff but have one on my shelf to read. Have lost my copy of the Crow Road which is really annoying because it was the one I wanted to read after hearing he'd died.

Also just seen Jo Nesbo will be doing a signing in Manchester in September so will have to head down to that!

Tbh, I've kind of given up on him some 15-18 years ago, can't even remember the last book I got and read anymore.
Sure, all very well written, very clever, sinister and dark, great. My kind of reading.

Compared to his earlier work, it lacks the brutal and provocative imagination imho.

Sweet deal on Nesbo :)

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 7:04 pm 
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Give Refuge to the Stranger by Linda Rabben.

It's about the situations in which humans have provided sanctuary to others who are fleeing things such as violence and persecution. It goes into a lot of detail about the history of sanctuary and how it has evolved into the concept of asylum today. Fascinating insight into the anthropological side of things and incorporates many specific stories.

It's more an educational text than a novel, but I'm absolutely loving it and finding it very powerful.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:08 pm 
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The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle

Veronika Decides to Die
Coelho Paulo

Both uplifting and special to me.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:42 pm 
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A Song of Ice and Fire: Clash of Kings


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 9:00 pm 
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I'm currently about halfway through Peter V. Brett's the Daylight War. Although this and the previous installment have not lived up to the promising start of The Painted Man, I'm still enjoying it. I'm also about a Chapter in to the Da Vinci Code. I know I'm about 10 years late, but I was too young at the time.

I would have finished both of these but my A-Levels mean I'm mostly reading textbooks atm...

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:04 am 
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I have just finished the first book of A song of Ice and Fire, ie A Game Of Thrones, thought it was an excellent book and I'm about to start A Clash Of Kings in the next couple of days.
One thing that amazed me is how close the TV show has stuck to the books, especially for the fist series/book. I really hope it continues to follow the books very closely in its tv adaptation as some programmes really do suffer if they make the jump from book to film/TV.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:43 am 
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Robbo-92 wrote:
I have just finished the first book of A song of Ice and Fire, ie A Game Of Thrones, thought it was an excellent book and I'm about to start A Clash Of Kings in the next couple of days.
One thing that amazed me is how close the TV show has stuck to the books, especially for the fist series/book. I really hope it continues to follow the books very closely in its tv adaptation as some programmes really do suffer if they make the jump from book to film/TV.

They do have to make some compromises in the seasons to follow, but luckily it's Martin himself who has adapted it to the screen.


At the moment reading this:
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 12:06 pm 
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The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 1:21 pm 
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yanbon24 wrote:
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest.

Great book. You must read the trilogy as they are all fantastic. My sister gave them to me the Xmas after they came out & I couldn't put them down. By the time we went on holiday to Bali in the first week of January I had read all three. As I usually read a book a week I only keep those books I found really special & I have kept these three books. It's a shame that the author died as I would have loved to have seen where he went next with his books :)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 1:26 pm 
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runningman67 wrote:
The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle

Veronika Decides to Die
Coelho Paulo

Both uplifting and special to me.

Great reads, nice.

Have you tried A New Earth by Tolle?

I find it a lot more 'accessible' than The Power of Now, that one took me a long, long time to digest :)

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:13 pm 
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Fyodor Dovstoyevsy: Demons

Not the easiest book I've ever read, on account that it was written 140 years ago by somebody who didn't write in English, but I'm very much enjoying it. The imagery and characterisation is wonderful and I'm only about 200 pages through the 800-odd.


[img]blog.incipeindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Demons-Fyodor-Dostoyevsky-671x1024.jpg/img]

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:57 pm 
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DrG wrote:
yanbon24 wrote:
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest.

Great book. You must read the trilogy as they are all fantastic. My sister gave them to me the Xmas after they came out & I couldn't put them down. By the time we went on holiday to Bali in the first week of January I had read all three. As I usually read a book a week I only keep those books I found really special & I have kept these three books. It's a shame that the author died as I would have loved to have seen where he went next with his books :)



I've already plowed through the first two, dont want this to be the last one! Apparently early drafts of the fourth one were found however obviously it'll never be :(


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:53 pm 
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I've been enjoying reading business/money books lately.
Just finished reading Millionaire Upgrade by Richard Cordock. Very inspiring book. Simple and straight to the point as well.

One book I actually keep going back to is The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason. I've read it countless times and it never fails to help me get back on track. I occasionally just open it to a random page to remind myself about my goals. It uses very simple language to explain the universal principles about money and becoming rich. I recommend the book to everyone.

Also, pick up at least one of Malcolm Gladwell's books.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:10 am 
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I am reading a collection of Roald Dhal short stories and when thats finished I have Sttep Approach to Garberdale it's one of only two Iain Banks books I havn't read yet. A real shame that I will only have three more of his books to read once his new book is out.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 3:11 pm 
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Nakojo wrote:
Two books, really.

The Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama, which is more of a contemplative process and takes more time to 'digest' than to actually read.

Since Ian Bank's passing over, I've started on The Player of Games again, one of my favourite sci-if novels and I haven't read it in decades :)

Wasp Factory might well be next. Love his early stuff.
But then again, I might pick up something by Bukowski.


:thumbup: Just finished reading some of Banks' old ones Player of Games, Consider Phlebas, Espadiar Street etc. Great stuff.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 5:22 pm 
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A Feast for Crows. Really really struggling with it though, been reading it for about 4 months, and just hit halfway. I think because A Storm of Swords ends in such a brilliant way, and a Feast for Crows is a little different in the way it tells the story, it's a struggle.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 5:48 pm 
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huggybear wrote:
A Feast for Crows. Really really struggling with it though, been reading it for about 4 months, and just hit halfway. I think because A Storm of Swords ends in such a brilliant way, and a Feast for Crows is a little different in the way it tells the story, it's a struggle.


I'm stuck on that one too. Have to force myself to read a chapter (or half) every night. My friend tells me the last one's good though so sticking with it!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 7:35 pm 
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Race2win wrote:
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This is my addiction for the moment

Good choice!

If you've already read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, Unfinished Tales gives loads of backstory for all 3 books before you move on to the History of Middle Earth collection.

That was a good use/waste of my teen years reading all those!

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 12:28 am 
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Ok, I know this isn't technically what I've been reading (although I did start the Wasp Factory earlier) but my dad said to me yesterday 'you know, Iain Banks is the only reason you read half as much as you do'. As so many of you have mentioned him in light of his recent passing I would like to mention how important he was in influencing me (and in doing that, try to persuade those who haven't read to give him a try) because there is no way I would read anything half as interesting as I do without him. He was the first person I read who was slightly off the beat, slightly out there and he gave me a reason to think my slightly twisted sense of humour wasn't that bad after all. He brought me into this new area of fiction that was literally 'read what you want, when you want, and don't be ashamed to enjoy it'.
If anyone hasn't read any of his stuff I would advise it. You might not enjoy it (his first book took many tries to get published. Half of the reviews are actually negative ones but they don't reflect on the standard of writing - focusing on the story itself) but you'll never doubt how amazing an author he is. The Crow Road is literally one of my favourite things that has ever been written. Anybody that can start a book with 'It was the day my grandmother exploded' (and yes, that is one of the only quotes I remember by heart from a book) just shows their skills as an author. This book has everything that you could look for. Humour (however dark), romance (however hidden to start with), detective (even if it's not the 'main plot') and throughout it all I've never loved the relationship between numerous different people as much as I have with this book. Honestly, no book will ever beat this for me and that's because he has this way of making you both love and hate a character all in one go, especially with them being Scottish (I might not be a Scot but I bloody wish I was!) it talks to me as an individual. I'd just like to say that Ian Banks is the reason that when I go into Waterstones I will spend extra on the 'buy one get one half price' as he is the reason that I try new things.
Sorry for the alcohol influenced tribute but I honestly don't know what to say about this man to give him full credit. He's given me a reason to dedicate a book based blog to him and I never do that kind of stuff. He's influenced me to read half as much as I do. And most importantly, he's influenced me to read whatever I feel like! He was really the kind of person everybody needed in their walk of life and I just wish he could've known what he meant to the individual. I know I wont be alone.

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Last edited by Rachie_D on Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 12:57 am 
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Biffa wrote:
Nakojo wrote:
Two books, really.

The Art of Happiness by the Dalia Lama, which is more of a contemplative process and takes more time to 'digest' than to actually read.

Since Ian Bank's passing over, I've started on The Player of Games again, one of my favourite sci-if novels and I haven't read it in decades :)

Wasp Factory might well be next. Love his early stuff.
But then again, I might pick up something by Bukowski.


:thumbup: Just finished reading some of Banks' old ones Player of Games, Consider Phlebas, Espadiar Street etc. Great stuff.

Yea, baby, that's what I'm talking about :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

The raw material :smug:

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 1:01 am 
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Rachie_D wrote:
Ok, I know this isn't technically what I've been reading (although I did start the Wasp Factory earlier) but my dad said to me yesterday 'you know, Iain Banks is the only reason you read half as much as you do'. As so many of you have mentioned him in light of his recent passing I would like to mention how important he was in influencing me (and in doing that, try to persuade those who haven't read to give him a try) because there is no way I would read anything half as interesting as I do without him. He was the first person I read who was slightly off the beat, slightly out there and he gave me a reason to think my slightly twisted sense of humour wasn't that bad after all. He brought me into this new area of fiction that was literally 'read what you want, when you want, and don't be ashamed to enjoy it'.
Of anyone hasn't read any of his stuff I would advise it. You might not enjoy it (his first book took many tries to get published. Half of the reviews are actually negative ones but they don't reflect on the standard of writing - focusing on the story itself) but you'll never doubt how amazing an author he is. The Crow Factory is literally one of my favourite things that has ever been written. Anybody that can start a book with 'It was the day my grandmother exploded' (and yes, that is one of the only quotes I remember by heart from a book) just shows their skills as an author. This book has everything that you could look for. Humour (however dark), romance (however hidden to start with), detective (even if it's not the 'main plot') and throughout it all I've never loved the relationship between numerous different people as much as I have with this book. Honestly, no book will ever beat this for me and that's because he has this way of making you both love and hate a character all in one go, especially with them being Scottish (I might not be a Scot but I bloody wish I was!) it talks to me as an individual. I'd just like to say that Ian Banks is the reason that when I go into Waterstones I will spend extra on the 'buy one get one half price' as he is the reason that I try new things.
Sorry for the alcohol influenced tribute but I honestly don't know what to say about this man to give him full credit. He's given me a reason to dedicate a book based blog to him and I never do that kind of stuff. He's influenced me to read half as much as I do. And most importantly, he's influenced me to read whatever I feel like! He was really the kind of person everybody needed in their walk of life and I just wish he could've known what he meant to the individual. I know I wont be alone.

Great review :)

All I can add, if you wanna jump in and go off beat to the provocative, dip into his earlier work :)

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 10:34 am 
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Macbeth.

I often wonder at why some writers are popular and others not so. It seems similar to films, average plots and average writing produce best sellers such as the Jack Reacher novels (ironically a poorly selling film), while the better writers with skill and imagination don't sell as well.
I remember reading The Wasp Factory and not feeling the slightest compulsion to read any of his other works, not that I didn't enjoy it, but maybe because I was trying to second guess the plot all the way through, and perhaps that ruined the experience for me. I guessed the girl's/boy's secret early on (though not the how and why), and for some reason I thought that the dwarf might be imaginary, so I was expecting an American Psycho type thing all along, so nothing towards the end really shocked me.

My favourite opening line from a book is "It's not easy cutting open a human head with a hacksaw".


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:01 pm 
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bbobeckyj wrote:
Macbeth.

I often wonder at why some writers are popular and others not so. It seems similar to films, average plots and average writing produce best sellers such as the Jack Reacher novels (ironically a poorly selling film), while the better writers with skill and imagination don't sell as well.
I remember reading The Wasp Factory and not feeling the slightest compulsion to read any of his other works, not that I didn't enjoy it, but maybe because I was trying to second guess the plot all the way through, and perhaps that ruined the experience for me. I guessed the girl's/boy's secret early on (though not the how and why), and for some reason I thought that the dwarf might be imaginary, so I was expecting an American Psycho type thing all along, so nothing towards the end really shocked me.

My favourite opening line from a book is "It's not easy cutting open a human head with a hacksaw".


Try A Song of Stone and see how quickly you work that one out. Something was nagging me all the way through to about 65% through the book and then there was a lightbulb moment. I wont spoil it for you if you don't know


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:59 pm 
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bbobeckyj wrote:
Macbeth.

I often wonder at why some writers are popular and others not so. It seems similar to films, average plots and average writing produce best sellers such as the Jack Reacher novels (ironically a poorly selling film), while the better writers with skill and imagination don't sell as well.
I remember reading The Wasp Factory and not feeling the slightest compulsion to read any of his other works, not that I didn't enjoy it, but maybe because I was trying to second guess the plot all the way through, and perhaps that ruined the experience for me. I guessed the girl's/boy's secret early on (though not the how and why), and for some reason I thought that the dwarf might be imaginary, so I was expecting an American Psycho type thing all along, so nothing towards the end really shocked me.

My favourite opening line from a book is "It's not easy cutting open a human head with a hacksaw".

A weird thing I always think about when simply looking at the covers or spines of a book is how big the authors name is compared to the title! It's one of pet peeves when the authors name is bigger and more prominent than the title, to me they're selling the book from their name, not the content.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:49 am 
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moby wrote:
I am re reading Huckleberry Finn. It is hilarious, but a good reminder what the mind set was not that long ago. We have progressed as a race despite what they say.


No offense, but it's no indication of the mindset at any time, it's a work of fiction, a fantasy world.

Recently I re-read a few of the early Tom Clancy novels, which I can actually stand to read unlike some later ones.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:07 pm 
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flyer wrote:
moby wrote:
I am re reading Huckleberry Finn. It is hilarious, but a good reminder what the mind set was not that long ago. We have progressed as a race despite what they say.


No offense, but it's no indication of the mindset at any time, it's a work of fiction, a fantasy world.
...

Is there not a subplot involving slavery in the American South?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:30 pm 
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Just finished Lord of the Rings.

Honestly, thought it was hideously boring. Tolkien needed some editting... One of the few cases where, for me, movie(s) better than book.

Also recently read To Kill a Mockingbird. I read it because, along with Catcher in the Rye, it is often on those lists of Top 25 books etc. Catcher in the Rye was absolute bollocks. Nothing happened. Nothing bad or dodgy occured. It was just Holden bumming about for a bit. Okay, a teacher tried to touch him up but seriously, why was this ever banned?
Anywho, To Kill a Mockingbird. Brilliant. A truly brilliant book. I was surpised how much I enjoyed this. After a slow start, it really picks up and in the end I was sad to finish it.


Sidenote: I generally don't read fiction. I don't really like fiction books. I like auto/biographies and science/pseudoscience type books. I liked Harry Potter, I liked To Kill a Mockingbird... Dark Materials was decent. I liked Lord of the Flies. I thought all Shakespeare was overrated and mostly pretty pish. Especially Hamlet. How do we wrap up the plot? Kill everyone! Dickens was kinda boring, but entertaining enough.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:50 pm 
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mac_d wrote:
Just finished Lord of the Rings.

Honestly, thought it was hideously boring. Tolkien needed some editting... One of the few cases where, for me, movie(s) better than book.


Also recently read To Kill a Mockingbird. I read it because, along with Catcher in the Rye, it is often on those lists of Top 25 books etc. Catcher in the Rye was absolute bollocks. Nothing happened. Nothing bad or dodgy occured. It was just Holden bumming about for a bit. Okay, a teacher tried to touch him up but seriously, why was this ever banned?
Anywho, To Kill a Mockingbird. Brilliant. A truly brilliant book. I was surpised how much I enjoyed this. After a slow start, it really picks up and in the end I was sad to finish it.


Sidenote: I generally don't read fiction. I don't really like fiction books. I like auto/biographies and science/pseudoscience type books. I liked Harry Potter, I liked To Kill a Mockingbird... Dark Materials was decent. I liked Lord of the Flies. I thought all Shakespeare was overrated and mostly pretty pish. Especially Hamlet. How do we wrap up the plot? Kill everyone! Dickens was kinda boring, but entertaining enough.

Tolkien himself, wasn't a typical fictional writer and the way he wrote TLOTR was very different to how anything would be written today. It was also written with him using his unpublished made up history of middle earth which he only invented for his own pleasure and was never supposed to be published, as such a awful lot of TLOTR has an unmentioned back story so readers have no clue as to what is being mentioned! I was one of the people who read it when I was 12 and loved it so much that I went about finding out about Middle Earth and all the cultures and history and such which has added to my enjoyment of TLOTR when re-reading.

The films have obviously been altered a fair bit to keep the plot relevant to the main story and move the story along as best they can using only the relevant information for the main characters, which I would say is a fair enough reason for changing the story when writing a screen play. The Hobbit on the other hand, they have really extended the book a lot in the first film and included little bits of the history of Middle Earth (although again altered slightly for the screen) that are neither in the book nor needed to progress the story! I'm guessing this is largely down to wanting to milk it for all it's worth in 3 films when the book could easily have been made into one single film!

Generally, I like to read a book as well as seeing the screen play as I usually find tv and films to be more of a accompaniment to the books. The exception there being The Color Purple, I saw bits of the film and it seemed ok although not my kind of film. But when I read the book some years later for a literature course at college - my God, it was a awful book! (my opinion obviously). I have to say the same about Frankenstein as well, seeing a few cheap horror adaptations and then reading the book, I just found it sooooo boring and nothing horror like at all, but I guess when it was written it had a much bigger impact.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 2:40 pm 
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Location: Sydney, Australia
yanbon24 wrote:
DrG wrote:
yanbon24 wrote:
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest.

Great book. You must read the trilogy as they are all fantastic. My sister gave them to me the Xmas after they came out & I couldn't put them down. By the time we went on holiday to Bali in the first week of January I had read all three. As I usually read a book a week I only keep those books I found really special & I have kept these three books. It's a shame that the author died as I would have loved to have seen where he went next with his books :)



I've already plowed through the first two, dont want this to be the last one! Apparently early drafts of the fourth one were found however obviously it'll never be :(

Yes, I too have heard about the fourth book. It's almost torture thinking about what may have been. The interesting thing is that I was about to ask you if you had read any Jo Nesbo books cause I have found them to be pretty close & then I re-read this thread to find that Jo Nesbo is mentioned quite a bit :D


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 3:12 pm 
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DrG wrote:
yanbon24 wrote:
DrG wrote:
yanbon24 wrote:
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest.

Great book. You must read the trilogy as they are all fantastic. My sister gave them to me the Xmas after they came out & I couldn't put them down. By the time we went on holiday to Bali in the first week of January I had read all three. As I usually read a book a week I only keep those books I found really special & I have kept these three books. It's a shame that the author died as I would have loved to have seen where he went next with his books :)



I've already plowed through the first two, dont want this to be the last one! Apparently early drafts of the fourth one were found however obviously it'll never be :(

Yes, I too have heard about the fourth book. It's almost torture thinking about what may have been. ...

Crichton had two books published after his death, one of which needed another writer to complete. The other reads like an extended synopsis, lacking qualities typical in his other work, I'm not alone suspecting that he hadn't actually finished it. No doubt there are other examples, so there might be a fourth 'The Girl Who... ' book in the future, but you might be better off not reading it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 6:29 pm 
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The $64 Tomato.

If anyone here has a small garden its worth the pick up. Funny and an super easy read.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:30 pm 
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minchy wrote:
Race2win wrote:
Image

This is my addiction for the moment

Good choice!

If you've already read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, Unfinished Tales gives loads of backstory for all 3 books before you move on to the History of Middle Earth collection.

That was a good use/waste of my teen years reading all those!


Tried several times, but cant seem to read this. I get in a few pages and it seems to drag, a few more and I dont know what I have just read and a few more and I decide to 'put it off for another time'.

I have read Hobbit and LOTR many times, but just cant do it. I think I did the same with leaf and tree though


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 10:02 pm 
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moby wrote:
minchy wrote:
Race2win wrote:
Image

This is my addiction for the moment

Good choice!

If you've already read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, Unfinished Tales gives loads of backstory for all 3 books before you move on to the History of Middle Earth collection.

That was a good use/waste of my teen years reading all those!


Tried several times, but cant seem to read this. I get in a few pages and it seems to drag, a few more and I dont know what I have just read and a few more and I decide to 'put it off for another time'.

I have read Hobbit and LOTR many times, but just cant do it. I think I did the same with leaf and tree though

I know what you mean, when I read them all I was only about 14 when I started and 19 when I finished! But I read them using the LOTR appendices as a constant reference as there's so many names and raves and gods and such. If you can ever get past the first few chapters to when Valinor is 'finished' and the Eldar are settled it gets more interesting, and some of the stories are really good if drawn out a bit.

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