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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:06 pm 
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 5:57 pm 
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With regards to Motorsport photography. I like to stand right next to the track and pan with a wide-angle lens, I think it gets you a kind of shot that you don't often see. The only issue is that very few tracks let you stand close enough and therefore the technique is still very much in experimental stage

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 2:00 am 
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haz wrote:
With regards to Motorsport photography. I like to stand right next to the track and pan with a wide-angle lens, I think it gets you a kind of shot that you don't often see. The only issue is that very few tracks let you stand close enough and therefore the technique is still very much in experimental stage

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It's common with rally photographers as they are the only real motor events where you can get close enough, It is also very common with photographers in pit lane. However this style of photography is the one of the most dangerous in motorsports, if you are going to continue with this style be very aware of your surroundings and never turn your back to a car. If you can, watch how the cars come past first before standing in a position, it will give you a good understanding of whether or not it is safe to stand there. Also be wary of debris being flicked up from behind the cars, many lenses and cameras have been ruined from rocks being flicked up as they go past by people standing too close.

If you want to see some good examples of this style, have a look on the wrc site.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:25 pm 
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Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 3:48 pm 
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Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:23 am 
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Jimbox01 wrote:
Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.

I use Canon, but I have never used the 75-300mm, I own a 70-300mm instead which I find is a fairly decent lens but with a few draw backs. With the 600d I think you are going to get a crop factor of around 1.3x meaning your lens will be roughly equivalent to 97.5-390mm instead of the 75-300mm.

What I suggest is that if you are new, stick to what you have bought. Learn to take quality pictures with the equipment you have, then once you get the knowledge, upgrade. Too many people blame their equipment and spend a lot of money on expensive lenses and bodies but only to gain little benefit from it. Also don't be afraid to take the camera off the auto settings!!

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Best Round Result: 1st (Monaco '12 & '15, Silverstone '14, Austria '15, Mexico '15, China '16)
Podiums: 11
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 4:01 pm 
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specdecible wrote:
Jimbox01 wrote:
Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.

I use Canon, but I have never used the 75-300mm, I own a 70-300mm instead which I find is a fairly decent lens but with a few draw backs. With the 600d I think you are going to get a crop factor of around 1.3x meaning your lens will be roughly equivalent to 97.5-390mm instead of the 75-300mm.

What I suggest is that if you are new, stick to what you have bought. Learn to take quality pictures with the equipment you have, then once you get the knowledge, upgrade. Too many people blame their equipment and spend a lot of money on expensive lenses and bodies but only to gain little benefit from it. Also don't be afraid to take the camera off the auto settings!!


Crop factor on an APS-C Canon DSLR such as the 600D is about 1.6. Your 75mm to 300mm lens therefore equates to 120mm to 480mm on a full frame camera. That should give you ample reach for photographing wildlife.

If you want to photograph very small animals (insects etc.) and produce bigger than life size images then you should invest in a macro lens.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 4:51 pm 
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specdecible wrote:
Jimbox01 wrote:
Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.

I use Canon, but I have never used the 75-300mm, I own a 70-300mm instead which I find is a fairly decent lens but with a few draw backs. With the 600d I think you are going to get a crop factor of around 1.3x meaning your lens will be roughly equivalent to 97.5-390mm instead of the 75-300mm.

What I suggest is that if you are new, stick to what you have bought. Learn to take quality pictures with the equipment you have, then once you get the knowledge, upgrade. Too many people blame their equipment and spend a lot of money on expensive lenses and bodies but only to gain little benefit from it. Also don't be afraid to take the camera off the auto settings!!

I completely agree (except for the crop factor ;) ), but if he's got some money burning a hole in his pocket, decent quality lenses hold their value quite well (particularly if bought 2nd hand), so why not splash out. :D

However...
When I went from a Fuji bridge camera to a Nikon D200, I initially bought a mid-priced zoom (18-200) and if I'm totally honest, the difference in quality wasn't worth the money - £600 just for the lens, compared to £350 for the bridge camera.
It wasn't until I made the next jump up cost/quality wise that the (new) lens really shone. Got a f/2.8 Nikkor 17-55DX and it was vastly better - not as flexible but far superior image quality.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 6:45 am 
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Jimbox01 wrote:
specdecible wrote:
Jimbox01 wrote:
Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.

I use Canon, but I have never used the 75-300mm, I own a 70-300mm instead which I find is a fairly decent lens but with a few draw backs. With the 600d I think you are going to get a crop factor of around 1.3x meaning your lens will be roughly equivalent to 97.5-390mm instead of the 75-300mm.

What I suggest is that if you are new, stick to what you have bought. Learn to take quality pictures with the equipment you have, then once you get the knowledge, upgrade. Too many people blame their equipment and spend a lot of money on expensive lenses and bodies but only to gain little benefit from it. Also don't be afraid to take the camera off the auto settings!!

I completely agree (except for the crop factor ;) ), but if he's got some money burning a hole in his pocket, decent quality lenses hold their value quite well (particularly if bought 2nd hand), so why not splash out. :D

However...
When I went from a Fuji bridge camera to a Nikon D200, I initially bought a mid-priced zoom (18-200) and if I'm totally honest, the difference in quality wasn't worth the money - £600 just for the lens, compared to £350 for the bridge camera.
It wasn't until I made the next jump up cost/quality wise that the (new) lens really shone. Got a f/2.8 Nikkor 17-55DX and it was vastly better - not as flexible but far superior image quality.

Fine 1.6x then Mr. Smarty Pants
I agree that If you have the money then buying a better lens right off the bat is a good way of saving some money in the long run, but he did say he was a student. I don't remember having any spare money in my pockets let alone having it burn holes in my pants ;)

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PF1 Pick 10 Competition
Best Round Result: 1st (Monaco '12 & '15, Silverstone '14, Austria '15, Mexico '15, China '16)
Podiums: 11
2018 Championship Standing: oh jeez...


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:03 am 
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specdecible wrote:
Jimbox01 wrote:
specdecible wrote:
Jimbox01 wrote:
Kevin McDonald wrote:
Brand new to serious photography, I've become interested in it as I have taken it as a subject in my final year of school. I've went for it and bought a Canon 600d with the twin lens kit. I felt I needed the 75-300mm lens due to natural world being my theme for my folio though since buying it (haven't yet received the camera) I've read some pretty poor reviews on that lens. Is there any recommendations for a decently-priced lens that can do some pretty decent close-up natural shots?

Don't use Canon, so can't really comment, but DPReview.com does some decent lens reviews. You might also want to consider third party lenses (e.g. Sigma) if cost is an issue. It's also worth going to a proper decent camera shop and asking if you can take some test shots on your own camera body, before you fork out any money.

Then of course there's eBay.

You could also have a search on Flickr for the types of photos you intend taking, and then ask the person what lens they used - EXIF info gives focal length but not the specific lens.

I use Canon, but I have never used the 75-300mm, I own a 70-300mm instead which I find is a fairly decent lens but with a few draw backs. With the 600d I think you are going to get a crop factor of around 1.3x meaning your lens will be roughly equivalent to 97.5-390mm instead of the 75-300mm.

What I suggest is that if you are new, stick to what you have bought. Learn to take quality pictures with the equipment you have, then once you get the knowledge, upgrade. Too many people blame their equipment and spend a lot of money on expensive lenses and bodies but only to gain little benefit from it. Also don't be afraid to take the camera off the auto settings!!

I completely agree (except for the crop factor ;) ), but if he's got some money burning a hole in his pocket, decent quality lenses hold their value quite well (particularly if bought 2nd hand), so why not splash out. :D

However...
When I went from a Fuji bridge camera to a Nikon D200, I initially bought a mid-priced zoom (18-200) and if I'm totally honest, the difference in quality wasn't worth the money - £600 just for the lens, compared to £350 for the bridge camera.
It wasn't until I made the next jump up cost/quality wise that the (new) lens really shone. Got a f/2.8 Nikkor 17-55DX and it was vastly better - not as flexible but far superior image quality.

Fine 1.6x then Mr. Smarty Pants
I agree that If you have the money then buying a better lens right off the bat is a good way of saving some money in the long run, but he did say he was a student. I don't remember having any spare money in my pockets let alone having it burn holes in my pants ;)

... but then if he's in his final year of school, and still cashing cheques at the bank of mum & dad, money might not be such a huge factor.

A couple of friends of mine went out and bought fairly expensive kit for their kids for similar reasons. I strongly advised them to save their cash, get a decent bridge camera (big zoom range, macro, manual controls etc.), and only invest in more expensive equipment once they were 100% sure it was actually going to be used. Neither of them listened, and in both cases the cameras ended up gathering dust in a cupboard - their money, their decision, but seemed like a bit of a waste to me.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 10:56 pm 
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I have a Canon 1000D with a 18-55mm and a 75-300mm lens. I don't take many natural world photos, and even less with the longer lense, but I've had a few (IMHO) really nice shots with the longer lense...

For example -
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SWANS canal trip

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up close

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:23 pm 
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*blows away cobwebs*

*collapses in coughing fit*

Went around London on Thursday (still aching from the distance travelled) and took a few photos along the way...

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Untitled

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White & Red

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Poppies

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Original Tower Poppies

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Untitled

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